How to Take Your Health Practice From In-Person to Online with Dr Tim Jackson

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Are you a practitioner that primarily focuses on in-person sessions but looking to take your practice online? Whether you’re looking to move entirely online, or have both a brick and mortar and online business, your online presence is absolutely essential. If your practice is perceived as a brick and mortar, how do you take that perception and make people think of looking for you in an online setting? It’s a tough question for many! The quick answer - create content, bring a lot to the table and bring a different skillset that can scale online. That’s where Dr. Tim Jackson comes in. 

Dr. Tim Jackson, DPT received his undergraduate degree in Health science and chemistry from Wake Forest University in 2003. He completed his Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT) from the Medical University of SC in 2009.

Realizing that manual therapy and orthopedic care helped only some of his patients, he began studying functional and environmental medicine, as well as digestive health, in an effort to help others achieve wellness. Dr. Tim is educated in nutritional biochemistry, digestive health and its systemic effects, as well as functional endocrinology. He recently completed the Spine portion of the Active Release Technique methodology, a system that addresses musculoskeletal trigger points and helps to expedite the healing process. Currently, Dr. Tim is working on his Functional Diagnostic Nutritionist certification.

We talk about many different topics in this episode including the link between chronic infection and mitochondrial issues, but our main focus and what everything ended up coming back to was how your take your practice into an online setting.

It’s no lie that the digital world serves the most people. You can connect with people that live down the block from you in your home town or live halfway across the world. This is the new way to connect and grow your business. Tune into. How Dr. Jackson did this, and how you can too!


Tools discussed in this episode:
Anchor app
healthtalksonline
Functional Diagnostic Nutrition Course

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TRANSCRIPT


Christine: Hello again and welcome to this new episode of The 360 Health Biz Podcast, and I'm super-excited, it's beautiful weather outside, we're in April, winter is behind us I hope. And with me is my wonderful, beautiful, totally kick-ass, badass Kendra Perry, co-host.

Kendra Perry: Hello.

Christine: The co-hostest with the mostest, and we have a super-exciting guest today, friend of mine, huge, long conversations with about all kinds of things, Dr. Tim Jackson, so I'm very, very excited to talk about how to take your offline practice to online, kind of things that you encounter, so this is especially interesting for those of you who will have a traditional brick and mortar business and who want to evolve into the online space, which we love at this podcast.

Christine: Now, don't forget, as always you will be able to follow on our blog and you will also find us on YouTube, you will find us obviously on Audio, but you can also watch us on our YouTube channel, so that's always fun to do. Then we are super-excited because as you know, each time when you learn something exciting I'll ask you to please, please, please leave us a five star review on iTunes and someone did that, not today actually, we apologize in advance because we kind of didn't followup and forgot to check.

Kendra Perry: Get up.

Christine: No.

Kendra Perry: I've been checking but yeah, iTunes doesn't really bring everything into one so they're kind of everywhere so we missed this one. This is actually from a couple of months ago, so Cathy Morris, we love you. We are sorry we have not read your review until now but we really appreciate it. She left us a short and sweet [crosstalk 00:01:39] that says, "These ladies are wonderful, true, heartfelt educators. They really want to help with their heath and plans. I love listening to them. Thank you Cathy for that review that you left two months ago, we really appreciate it. It's warming our heart now.

Christine: We do, we do, we totally do. Thank you so, so much. And if you want to receive as much love from us as we just sent over to Cathy, hope you feel all warm and tingly, then please go and head over to iTunes right now and leave us a review. So hit pause, leave us a review, and we'll be making sure to give you a shout out next episode.

Kendra Perry: Sooner than two months from now.

Christine: It's so typical of us to miss that kind of stuff, you know how it is.

Kendra Perry: We're disorganized gong shows, so-

Christine: No real surprise there, right? Unless you send us money. We will take that gladly, immediately-

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and then it'll be on there in [crosstalk 00:02:30]-

Christine: We have a Patreon page, by the way. Go to our website 360healthbizpodcast.com and you can donate to support our cause. All right, so without further ado, Dr. Tim Jackson, super-excited to have you here. You have a massively impressive biography with all kinds of degrees and all kinds of diplomas and education, so it's basically you just read it and you're like, "Oh my God, your brain must be huge," so in a nutshell, who are you, what do you do?

Dr. Tim Jackson: My doctorate's in physical therapy and rehabilitation, my undergrad is in health science and chemistry. I started out doing orthopedic rehabilitation and sports medicine, and I kind of knew all along that I wanted to incorporate functional medicine aspects into it, just because a lot of times your musculoskeletal pain, if it's not 100% caused by internal issues it's 80% caused by internal issues, so I can adjust your spine and mobilize your elbow, but why are those things inflamed? I figured out that I was pretty good at functional medicine and there weren't many people doing it, I was doing it before there was really a name for it and there were a ton of people doing orthopedics.

Dr. Tim Jackson: And so I work with people and I'm working on narrowing down my ideal client avatar, but I have everyone from professional athletes to kids on the autism spectrum. A lot of people will say, "How can those two populations have anything in common?" Mitochondrial dysfunction, gut issues, so there's actually a lot they have in common, and so I work with clients from all over the world as part of my Heal Your Body Program, working in layers versus one-time consults.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I also do practice consulting with traditional medical clinics that are looking to incorporate functional medicine, IV nutrition, functional lab testing, supplementation and nutritional consultation.

Kendra Perry: Man, how do you get it all done? It sounds like a ton of things, wearing tons of hat.

Christine: I'm just exhausted listening to that.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I sleep like a boss, that's how.

Christine: Secret. If you don't, get in touch with me.

Kendra Perry: Shameless plug.

Christine: Totally. All right, so I think it's super-interesting because I'm pretty sure we have ... I find that so many people who work with physical therapy who start to shift into the functional medical corner, and I do think that you just told us that you work with people all over the world. I guess it just is like a change of thinking that you actually do that, because I guess when you start out you do have the typical idea of a brick and mortar business, where people come see you and, as you said, you kind of ... I don't know what you do, you press and prod and I don't know what else you do.

Kendra Perry: Poke.

Christine: In order to get them back into shape, so I can imagine that people will say, "Okay, so how is this dude going to help me with his webcam, you know?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right. Sure, I mean it's the same sort of principle as osteopathic medicine chiropractic. There are plenty in those professions that don't do manual therapy or hands-on, so I get a lot of emails with people asking, "Oh, can I come to you in person?" You can, it's not really going to change what we do. You still need a local primary care physician who can prescribe medication if needed, and who can you see for emergency issues, and physical exams and things of that nature.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I work more on looking at biochemical and biophysical imbalances and finding those pathways that are congested or block and optimizing them. And so it doesn't really matter where you are, to a certain extent lab testing is different in different parts of the world. But for example, in Canada, good luck getting a Reverse T3 tested, it's not going to happen.

Kendra Perry: I can get it done. I can get it done. I have a great naturopath, but yeah, it's a pain in the ass. They send it away and then you wait forever, and then they always forget it and you're like, "I paid for this. I paid for this. Give it to me." [inaudible 00:07:05]

Dr. Tim Jackson: Exactly. Yeah, I mean a lot of it I've kind of moved since when I started practicing I mean I was definitely more heavily focused on the supplementation. Of course, I still use supplements but I try to give people the best return on their investment, things like far infrared sauna, red light therapy, my molecular hydrogen machine over here. Those are things that are going to continue to work for you month after month without having to purchase a new one.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and so how do you use near infrared and far infrared sauna therapies? I'm so obsessed with light therapy. I've got my Joovv light, I've got my sunlight and sauna, are you using that primarily for detox and mitochondrial function?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, so I have the REDjuvenator, the ... Well, we could talk about that another time, but I wouldn't repurchase it, but it has red and near-fared. I use it for collagen production, [inaudible 00:08:08] 21, and-

Kendra Perry: He looks 21. Get on YouTube and watch the video so you can check him out.

Christine: Yeah, it's actually very true. I might have to get that machine, even if it's not working for you totally, but just does half I'm in, sign me up.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Hey, it's working for me. Have you seen this face?

Christine: Oh yeah.

Kendra Perry: He's glowing.

Christine: He's absolutely. I'm sure he doesn't have the green filter on like we do, you know?

Kendra Perry: We're cheating.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I don't even know how to do that, so no, I don't have that on. But I use the red light therapy mostly for mitochondrial boosting, collagen production is kind of a side benefit, but a lot of the products out there don't have the power output that they should to achieve a therapeutic affect. But it's one of those things that you can incorporate, your whole family can use. You do have to be careful with, and I know we don't want to get too off-topic, but in people who are really toxic even five minutes of stimulating the mitochondria any time you increase cellular energy production you're going to turn on a lot of things that were turned off. And so you just have to be careful of that.

Christine: Do you sometimes have clients ... How do you do this exactly? Do they have to see you are you going to tell a client, "Look, I do recommend that you do this," and then you tell them how to do it? Or how does that work?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, I mean, it's all part of a comprehensive program and I take into their account their budget and they're already doing. Some people who've come to me are already doing red light therapy and a lot of other biohacks. Other times I may recommend two supplements, gluten-free diet and far infrared sauna. Because I could recommend a zillion things, but it's just going to overwhelm them and you have to kind of meet people where they are and let them experience some success and get that momentum going. If you do that, then they'll buy-in, and I've found that if you can do something right off the bat that really makes them feel it, then they'll buy-in to everything else.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Someone told me once, "Give them a little bit of what they want and a lot of what they need." They might come to me for anti-aging but I might look at chronic infection, and they don't necessarily understand the connection but I do.

Christine: Sort of what I do, the niche is sleep but it's never just sleep, it just like one of the symptoms so it's exactly what you're saying, yeah.

Kendra Perry: It's all connected and I think people have a hard time wrapping their head around that because we've been raised in this sort of compartmentalized medical system, and no matter how often or how much I try to explain it to certain people they still don't get it, so you just exactly have to give them what they want, and then they're like, "Oh, this is great. I want to take things to the next level." Right?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right.

Kendra Perry: And so you've obviously been around for a very long time. You were with functional medicine before it was called functional medicine, probably dates you a little bit to the audience, but what did that transition look like when you were seeing people in clinic, in office when you realized you could utilize the Internet to reach more people around the world?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah. I mean, I had been on the different forums and before Facebook and social media was popular, the health and medical forums were really popular and so I was on those back in the day, but I always realized that there were people locally who would go pay cash to see someone else versus coming to our clinic and using their insurance. So I think the dilemma is people want to transition into the online space but they don't want to up their game. You can't just transition and not have it on advanced skillset or something unique that you bring to the table.

Christine: That's a good point, yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, when you're transitioning or when I was transitioning, I just tried to put out good information and I definitely didn't know anything about SEO or any of that, and it just got shared really. I have medical doctors now that refer to me, other clinicians, acupuncturists, et cetera, but I think even if you're going to have a brick and mortar practice you still need to have a good online presence.

Dr. Tim Jackson: For example, when I lived in Atlanta the owned of the clinic where I worked part-time, he didn't understand that you can't just put up a sign and expect people to show up. I mean, there's a million functional medicine clinics in Atlanta and if someone googles, "Relevant functional medicine terms," you want to be at the very top. And so I think having an online presence is important, whether you're all virtual or you're split or all brick and mortar.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, I mean it's a really good point. Nothing drives me more crazy then when I'm trying to find more information about a business or a menu and they don't have a website or a Facebook page that they update, and I'm just like, "How?" I don't understand. How do you not have any sort of online, even if you're a local business, right? People traveling to the area, people ... For me, if it's not convenient, I'm out. Gone.

Christine: Me too. If it takes me more than two seconds to have a nice mobile-friendly page I'm out, and it's so annoying. Because okay, I'm just in the process of getting a kitten so I'm Googling breeders. You wouldn't believe how many of them have like wicks pages from 1995 or something like that. It's not mobile-friendly, you need to zoom into everything and press buttons and things, and I'm just like, "No, no, no, no, no." I would love to actually write them emails and say, "Look, I'm going to do your website for free because this is too frustrating."

Kendra Perry: And your next career is building cat websites.

Christine: Totally, there's a huge market there, I think.

Kendra Perry: I think there is.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, and they're also seeing my friend who is a psychiatrist.

Christine: See? There we go, mixed business. But I find we are all the same kind of age, we're actually all 56, we just look amazing to get because we have saunas and stuff. I think we are actually really lucky because we are belonging to the millennium breed, but we're still a generation ... One of millennium parts we remember the analog world but also the digital, so I think it really helps because if we have people, like the person who unfortunately was inflexible who ran the clinic that you worked at who were just totally analog, they really have a hard time understanding the digital. I think our generation is actually super-lucky because we understand how they think, and yet we grew up figuring all this crap out because it was basic.

Christine: I remember the first chatroom I was in was actually an ISC chatroom where you had to program everything, it was basically like a dot kind of an [inaudible 00:15:30] something. I didn't know it was that at the time, with my 14 years. But we had to figure it all out, so I think that makes us really techy in a way, if you're interested. You also have people of our generations who are not, but at the same time we really do get the analog thinking as well.

Christine: I find that that is really a gift in a way, because we kind of also know what other people are looking for. So some people still just look for signs, but it's translating that into Google as in saying, "Look, you are actually on a street. You Google ranking is the biggest billboard in town, in a way, so if you're listening and you are a couple of generation ahead of us and you just don't dig this digital stuff, really one of my pieces of advice would be just open your mind and you have to then hire someone who does it for you.

Christine: Because I think there is absolutely no way that you can get served the most people possible if you don't have an online presence, even if you're not ready to take your complete business online. But if you do have a business that people perceive as being a brick and mortar business, so for example I perceive someone who does osteopathy physical therapy to be a hands-on business. How do you take that perception for people even to think about looking for that online, because I would never consider it an online business? How do you do that for people to actually understand that they can work with that online?

Christine: You talked a little bit about creating content, so I would be interested to know a little bit about how that opened doors for people worldwide to find you and to actually even get the idea to hire someone in that area of expertise online, versus going and looking for a brick and mortar close by.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Well, I think, I mean all the content that I've produced has been functional medicine. None of it has been orthopedic related. It's just like with osteopaths or chiropractors who don't adjust or they just do nutritional consultations, et cetera. If someone wants manual therapy or an adjustment, et cetera, of course they need to see someone in person, but I just made sure that everything I talked about was functional medicine related, neuro immune related, gut health, hormones, et cetera and so no one ever really perceived me as this orthopedic manual therapy guy.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, I've just focused on putting out content about mitochondria and all those other topics in functional medicine and red light therapy, and so when you put that out there and hope that people find you, and yeah.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, it seems like if you do do manual therapy of some sort and you want to go online, I guess it depends ... Like you said, you need to bring a lot to the table or you need to have a different skillset. Where I live there's a massage therapy school, and so there's a ton of massage therapists in my town and they're always three years in they're stoked on it, and three years in they're just like, "I can't scale up. I don't know how to scale up my business," because they can only do so many massages, right, in a day or they burn out.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right.

Kendra Perry: And so I've been thinking a lot about them and I'm like, "You need some sort of subset of skills that you could bring online, or something that you can teach to bring online or otherwise, yeah, if you just do physical therapy you really can only hit so high and they're you're stuck."

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right. Yeah, I mean it's just like with chiropractors adjusting people. If that's all you do, I mean it's going to wear on your body a lot and there's reason why you don't see very many old doctors or physiotherapy or doctors of chiropractic, and it is very energy intensive, I mean especially if you want to get good results to do soft tissue release, manipulation, that sort of thing. I mean, I would often break out in a sweat just working on a patient.

Dr. Tim Jackson: And so that kind of stuff if people want a physical examination or a movement examination, I mean I can do that virtually and look at what reflexes are integrated or not and how their movement patterns are, and a lot of times it involves resolving inflammation and other functional medicine root cause stuff.

Christine: Yeah. If you had to do it again would you start out with physical therapy again or would you say, "Hell no, I would just go straight into functional medicine?"

Dr. Tim Jackson: Well, I mean that's the thing. People always ask me about going to school for functional medicine and there is no school for functional medicine. I don't care what people say, I'm sure I'll piss a lot of people off but I do that anyways. Naturopaths did not-

Christine: Welcome to the club, dude. [crosstalk 00:20:49]

Dr. Tim Jackson: Naturopaths did not own functional medicine, okay? Let's get that out there. The Institute of Functional Medicine doesn't own functional medicine, and so someone told me, "Just buy a ticket to play the game." I'd probably just get my FDN, honestly. I mean, why go to school for eight years? I mean, you know?

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and I think that's maybe the post that we reconnected on Facebook on, it was someone who was posting about the University of Functional Medicine and you said something about, you're like, "Why waste $30 grand when you could just take one of Bryan Walsh's course and learn so much more?" And I think I was like, "Hell, yeah," or something like that and that's kind of where I chimed in. But yeah, it's so true. I see a lot of people spending so much money on traditional education in [inaudible 00:21:34] functional medicine, but in the end, I mean the great thing about ...

Kendra Perry: You mentioned the FDN course. Both me and Christine have done that course and then we love it because it gives us the ability to order the labs and actually get in the game. But a lot of people who've done some of this more expensive functional medicine education, if they're on license they still can't order labs, so what's the point?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right, right. Exactly. And, I mean ultimately the stuff that you learn, the most important stuff I've learned has been me kind of piecing together things. Someone might hear me on a podcast or read an article, but they don't necessarily appreciate that it took five years to put all that together, it didn't just show up.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, yeah. Yeah, it so true. It's so complex and everyone's like, "Oh, what's your education?" I'm like, "Sure, I've got all these letters beside my name but most of them don't mean anything and haven't contributed at all to my skillset, whatsoever." And a lot of what we do is just working clinically, working with clients, speaking with other practitioners, spending our extra time in the deep dark corners of Club Med and looking at shit, right? People don't get that. You're like, "Can I put hours of looking at shit beside my name?"

Christine: Yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Actually I just saw a new ... she calls herself a nutritionist website, and under her credentials she had a list of the articles she had read, and I'm like, "There's not enough bandwidth for the number of articles that I've read."

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine: Yeah, I probably don't even remember all of them, that's true. That's true.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: I find the little people ... yeah, go ahead.

Dr. Tim Jackson: No, I mean I just think it's silly that people look for certain letters to mean certain things, like they think, "Oh, if you're an optometrist then you can't do functional medicine," or, "If you're a dentist you can't do functional medicine." Why not?

Christine: Yeah, totally. And I find that's the first question I will usually get when I do talks or anything, it's like so people are looking at me, they're like, "So are you a doctor then?" You know? Or they're like that's the first question I always get, "So do you have a medical license?" Or, "Are you a doctor then?" And it's like, "No, but I have doctors sending me a lot of clients because they're just stuck at a certain point and they know that I get results. I work completely differently."

Christine: But it used to bother me, it used to really piss me off, like if you don't have the MD or the doctor in front of your name it's like okay, there's no cred in a way. I think it is shifting because a lot of people just know just through their own experience that there's a lot of boundaries in the traditional MD world and that it's just more for emergency cases. If you are an emergency, obviously it's the best thing that happened to us but, if not, very often everything is fine even though you feel like shit.

Christine: I found that is still something that people need to get used to, that you don't necessarily have to be an MD in order to be great at functional medicine.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, when people ask- Sorry, go ahead.

Kendra Perry: Go ahead. You go.

Dr. Tim Jackson: When people ask me if I'm an MD I say, "No, I'm your doctor's doctor," which in a lot of cases is true. Which in a lot of cases I true. I mean, I have probably five or six MDs now as clients, so that's my response.

Christine: That's [crosstalk 00:25:06].

Kendra Perry: Totally. And I've spent a bunch of time training licensed practitioners, I do a big focus on hair mineral analysis and just ran a course. I had a couple of doctors in there, a couple of naturopaths, a couple of dietitians and then a bunch of health coaches. But yeah, it's like I think that barrier with the letters is breaking down a little bit. I feel like people are caring less and less, but I think it also when you're starting out, when you're unlicensed people feel really maybe inferior or they feel like they need to keep upgrading their education rather than just getting out there, and getting clients and doing the work. Because that's really what makes you a good practitioner. It's not the education or the letters, it's having clinical experience and actually working with the people.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Absolutely. Definitely. Well said.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine: Tell us bit about with all the experience that you had working with clients online all over the place, what would be your top three things that you see over and over again? And what are some of the things that were maybe surprising after you started to transition from what you started out of, more in physical therapy to functional medicine? What are the three things that stuck in your head where you were like, "I wouldn't have thought this, but I see this over and over and over again."

Dr. Tim Jackson: Well, I shouldn't say this surprised me, but I was always fascinated with the immune system and chronic infections, and even with orthopedic type stuff, people with bilateral knee pain they've found mycoplasma antigen antibody complexes in the synovial fluid in the joint. Yeah, I can mobilize your knee and release the soft tissues that connect into the meniscus, but it's really an inflammatory immune issue, and that really applies to all orthopedic situations. But whether people know it or now, and everyone's worried about getting the flu and an acute infection, when the reality is the stealth chronic infections that hang around and get into the brain, and the nervous system, the heart, the blood vessels, the liver, those are what you should be concerned about because they create a constant inflammatory cascade that's going to manifest differently in everyone.

Dr. Tim Jackson: The three of us may all get infected with the same pathogen, Kendra may have headaches, you may have sleep issues, and I'm just making funny of you to the sleep, and you may have-

Christine: I thought you'd say diarrhea, but it's fine. I prefer the sleep issue.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yes, diarrhea-

Christine: Loose poop.

Dr. Tim Jackson: ... we'll go with that. And I may have an elevated heart rate, so I would say that chronic infections would be number one. That's something that most people are dealing with whether they realize it or not, and we have a world of underperforming people, and a lot of times they kind of chalk it up to, "Oh, I'm just not smart," or, "I'm just not this or that," and-

Christine: Just getting old.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, a lot of being controlled by things that they've just never been taught to look at or look for. I would say the chronic infections, of course the mitochondrial issues. If you can boost the mitochondria everything works better, and then the circadian rhythm and environmental health. I kind of group indoor air quality, I deal a lot with mold toxicity, and that directly drops blood flow to the frontal lobe in the brain in addition to impacting various aspects of your immune system.

Dr. Tim Jackson: The chronic infection, the mitochondria, because when people hear mitochondria they think energy, they think, "Oh, go work out," but they don't realize that everything, like the thoughts that I'm thinking right now, that requires energy production, my heart beating requires energy production, and so everything in your body will suffer when energy production suffers.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I tell people at the end of the day we'll do functional lab testing, but the two best tests are what's your body temperature and what's your sex drive?

Kendra Perry: Very cool.

Dr. Tim Jackson: You know? Because nature never wants to reproduce anything that's weaker, it only wants to reproduce things that are stronger and have more vitality. And so if you have low libido, when people and ... I don't want to call anyone out, but these fertility clinics popping up everywhere when you just bypassed that process, you're asking for trouble.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, I totally agree. I see that all the time. I work with women and I see just so many women going through yeah, all the crazy fertility treatments. They haven't been able, they've been trying for 10 years and it's just like they're doing in vitro, they're doing the fertility drugs, and they're just forcing these babies out of the body that doesn't actually want them to have a baby because they're not quite healthy enough. I think that's a big think.

Kendra Perry: I mean, it's a tough topic because women, they really want it, it's a very emotional thing. It's a tough one. It's hard to convince women sometimes, especially when they're older, when they're in their later 30s early 40s and they feel like they're running out of time to just focus on health first and not do the IVF or do the crazy fertility hormones that just make you dump eggs like a motherfucker.

Christine: Yeah, nuts. And nobody asks you-

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, I get-

Christine: ... about your energy levels or anything like that. Because I've gone through, not all the way, but the beginning stages of those treatments when we tried to have a second one, thank God we didn't, but nobody asks you these questions, like no one. It's crazy to me but it doesn't matter. It's really about okay, we're still very lucky in Luxembourg because our insurance actually covers everything, our national health insurance, so it's still different but it's still, "Okay, you have this problem, hence we're going to do this process." Nobody talks to you about diet, nobody talks to you about your energy levels, nobody talks to you about anything that might have to do that your natural body is just not up to it, because producing a little human is pretty complex, you know?

Kendra Perry: It's a big fucking deal.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right. Yeah, and to piggyback off what Kendra said, I get a fair number of emails from women who are in their late 30s, early 40s, and they're like, "Dr. Tim, I've got to get pregnant yesterday," and I'm like, "Well, just pump the brakes for a minute and give me six months and I promise you it will pay off a lot in the long-term, verus trying to fix stuff after the fact."

Kendra Perry: Yeah, yeah. And I'm always amazed, I've worked with people who they're so burnt out, they're so exhausted, they have no energy, they don't sleep well, they're literally burnt out on the floor and they're like, "I want to have a baby." I'm like, "That is crazy. How? How are you going to do that and how are you going to raise a child when you're that fucking tired?" It's just [crosstalk 00:32:15]-

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right, yeah. I agree with you 100%. It's kind of like people that have two kids and they can't parent them well, so let's have a third.

Christine: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, I know. Eww.

Christine: Thank God we're here tooting our horn. No, but it's very true. I mean, there's such a shift in paradigm having this information out, and I think part of it is because we do need to put that information out in order to be found and in order to run our businesses. On the one hand, yes, it's to the good for the people because we want them to learn more. On the other hand, it's just quite for us being in business it's important too, so it's really this two-way street but it's a win-win situation in the end, I reckon.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right, absolutely. Yeah, I mean I'm trying to become a jetsetter like you and just fly all over the place and live in luxurious resorts.

Christine: October, Bali people, 2019. Check it out. Self-promo, I'm sorry. I cannot help it.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, you're on fire today. You're just like, "I'm going to promote myself all episode long."

Christine: There's so many opportunities. What am I supposed to do?

Kendra Perry: You got to take it. You got to take it where you can get it.

Christine: Yeah. No, but I mean, it's what an online business is in the end. I think you have to give yourself a little bit of a nudge in order to be visible, it's not easy for everyone, and I think you have to do it in the way that suits you. Kendra and I, we obviously love the camera and we're like, "Hi," it's grim stories and all kind of witches talk, but other people are not. I think, for those, it's really a lot better that you create written content, and I think that's what you do mainly too, right?

Dr. Tim Jackson: What kind of content, sorry?

Christine: Written content.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Oh, written. Yeah. I mean, it's not that I don't like the camera. I do a ton of podcasts and summit interviews, I just hadn't gotten my lazy butt around to filming myself yet. Maybe I can talk to you guys off-air about what camera I need. But yeah, I want it to make me even younger and even more muscular, so-

Kendra Perry: We just need to show you how to use the zoom filter. Really, without the zoom filter, it is the morning, I just rolled out of bed, first coffee, I'm haggard, but the zoom filter it cleans me right up.

Christine: [crosstalk 00:34:45]. No, I mean [inaudible 00:34:48].

Dr. Tim Jackson: You look like you're in a studio right now Christine. Are you in some kind of-

Christine: Yeah, I have my studio set up. I was recording. What was I recording? Oh, my introduction to the website. I redid that, so yeah. I've been doing some video, more pro stuff, but it didn't turn out the way I wanted to. I may have to do it again. Yeah, sometimes I ... I love this stuff, I love [inaudible 00:35:10], I love ... I spend shitloads of money on that stuff, but I think it's to each their own, right? But-

Dr. Tim Jackson: I, personally, would rather have an aneurysm than deal with that stuff.

Kendra Perry: See? Oh my God. Really?

Christine: It's not [crosstalk 00:35:26]-

Dr. Tim Jackson: Biochemistry, that doesn't stress me out. Pathophysiology, that doesn't stress me out. You start talking about metatags and H1, H2, and my HPA is just choo, choo, choo.

Kendra Perry: Just gone.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, I have zero patience for that.

Christine: I do have a question though, because you just mentioned that you do lots of summits and lots of podcasts, so let's talk a little bit about that. Do you think this has helped your mastery with your business? Is this ... Because I know it's such a trend and so many people have done it, especially you people listening to this, it's about how can you make your coaching business or health practice more successful. I think you have these huge companies like what are they called? Health Talks Online-

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah.

Christine: ... and all these huge, huge, huge summit and I had my own summit a couple of years ago and you were actually an expert on that, and my list grew hugely, my email list, but I lost pretty much all of those people again, so as soon as I pitched the something. I'm wondering, has it been successful for you?

Dr. Tim Jackson: I think it has. People end up following my work and reading my articles. They may overtime become clients immediately, it may be two years down the road but just to give you an example. I was a coffee shop in Sedona, Arizona, and two separate people who didn't know each other came up and they were like, "Hey, weren't you on the Bulletproof Executive podcast?" And I was like, "Yeah, you watch that?"

Christine: Wow, pretty big deal.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, that's [crosstalk 00:37:03]-

Christine: I've never had that happen to me, there you go.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Well, that's just because you're a household name already, so ... But yeah, I mean I think it has. I haven't nurtured the opt-in email list because, again, all that stuff just stresses me out.

Christine: Mm-hmm (affirmative). I don't have a [crosstalk 00:37:19].

Dr. Tim Jackson: If I can pay someone to turn on my computer I probably would. That's just the reality of it. But the summits, I've never hosted a summit. I've been on, I think, nine or 10 and I think that did help me get a fair number of clients. But, like you said, people want ... in this day and age they're spoiled in terms of content and information. The other day just to give you a quick example, I made a post that was again to you, there's probably 1% of the world that knows this and it was about THC depleting potassium. Someone responded, "Where are your citations?" And I'm thinking, "Okay, yeah. Let me just stop seeing patients and I'll be a librarian and I'll start posting those links. That's what I'll do all day."

Dr. Tim Jackson: It gets kind of ridiculous and there's so much content out there you have to just kind of be consistent with it, I guess, and consistent with your messaging, and get in front of the right people because a lot of the people that I've met that are world famous, they definitely don't know the most they're just really good at marketing.

Christine: Yeah, and I think that's an issue a little bit in our ... As you say, people are very spoiled and it is a bit of an issue because you need to market yourself in order to get ads there but, at the same time, you need to have a quality service so it is tricky, definitely.

Kendra Perry: But I think what you just said, Tim, just kind of summed up how to have a successful online business, you were like be consistent, create consistent content, and I think it was create valuable content. It was something along those lines, I just kind of brain farted on a few of those things. But yeah, I feel like people want ... They're like, "Okay, well what's the strategy? How do I make it? Tell me the sexy stuff," and it's like, "Be consistent," and everyone's like, "Uh, what?" But it's so true. You just need to be consistent. You just need to keep showing up, you need to keep spreading your message, which is actually, I think, the other thing you said there.

Kendra Perry: Keep telling your story, spreading your message, be consistent, provide valuable content and don't give up, really. That's what it comes down to, I think.

Christine: Yeah, yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, and if you have flaunt it. I mean, I know so many that they don't really know very much but they charge a hefty penny. So hey, if you can't beat them, join them. Maybe I'll start doing shirtless podcasts.

Christine: You'd actually have an awesome podcast. If you just recorded what you wrote, all our blog posts and everything you know, it would be an amazing podcast, actually.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Maybe I can fly to Luxembourg and do it in your studio there.

Christine: That would be totally worth it. Kendra, we need to make an episode on how to do podcasts and what kind of [crosstalk 00:40:19].

Kendra Perry: yeah, totally.

Christine: I was just thinking that. I wrote it on my notepad where I wrote, "Hire Jamie Jensen, and do a [crosstalk 00:40:28] podcast."

Kendra Perry: Yeah, well I think podcasts are a great way to get out there. And I mean, me personally, I've said this a lot, but I don't consume video content because I don't have fucking time. When I'm off my computer I'm moving around, I'm getting shit done, I'm out on my bike so I listen to an obscene amount of podcasts in a day, I'm always listening to them. I don't really listen to music, so it's a good way to get in your ideal client's ears while they're in their car or on their run, or whatevs.

Christine: Yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right.

Christine: Especially if you don't like the camera it's very easy to do.

Kendra Perry: You don't have to do it like we do.

Christine: No, you can literally take your iPhone, if you have Anchor, it's an app and you can literally just hit the record button like you do on a voice memo and it really uploads it straight onto your podcasts clouds, and yet it's available on Spotify and iTunes, and you literally just take your iPhone and you speak into it whatever's in your head. It's super-easy nowadays, yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Got you. I'll have to ask you some stuff off here about that.

Christine: Yeah. All right. What else did we forget? We're super-organized, as you can see.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, in terms of people looking. Now, functional medicine's a buzzword, and it's funny you mentioned doctors of physical therapy, people don't traditionally take them as doing functional medicine, but when I went into my doctorate program it was actually harder to get into than the MD program.

Christine: Really?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, yeah. It had become very popular, but the same thing happened that happened with attorneys. They opened up a lot of new schools at once and then that diluted the pool, and so that drove salaries down. But I think having a brick and mortar if you want to incorporate functional medicine into it, hire someone to help you with the low hanging fruit, things that you can do immediately, and hire someone ... There are hormone clinics popping up all over the place and you can just do hormones. I mean, you can, but if the gut's messed up or you're extremely toxic they're not good enough to work.

Dr. Tim Jackson: That's how functional medicine kind of gets a bad name, I think, people they just see dollar signs because they know if they name their clinic so-and-so Hormone Clinic, then people are going to come. But if I were to have a brick and mortar and call it ... I would probably call it something Hormone Clinic, but then I would drop all the other stuff on it.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, no it's a good point. I mean, hormones are just so trendy these days, and I mean all the women who I work with are like, "Oh, what about my hormones? What about my hormones?" I'm like, "We've been working on your hormones for a year, just not-"

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right.

Christine: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: "We've been working on your gut, your minerals, we've been detoxing metals, we're working on your hormones we're just not giving you hormones and [crosstalk 00:43:26] them specifically, but people don't like that.

Christine: Yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right, but that would require thinking. I read a stat the other day or a few weeks ago, the average IQ is dropping seen points every four to five years.

Kendra Perry: What? Is that a lot? That seems like a lot.

Dr. Tim Jackson: That is a lot.

Christine: That's a huge point.

Dr. Tim Jackson: So in nine to 10 years that's going to be 14 points, that's a lot.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, well I think my IQ is going up seven points every year. I think I'm good.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I think my sexiness factor's going up exponentially.

Christine: [crosstalk 00:44:02].

Kendra Perry: Oh, that's so interesting. And you think that's due just to all the crazy, sick unhealthiness going on these days?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, I mean I think a lot of it is low thyroid and a lot of it is mitochondrial dysfunction, because the nervous system has the highest concentration of mitochondria, so the first system that goes offline when you have mitochondrial dysfunction is the brain.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. yeah, true. I mean, so many of my clients, yeah, they have brain fog or they just have no memory, no recollection. They just forget everything, they have brain fog, they have mental health issues, it's so common, more common than any other symptom I feel like is brain shit.

Dr. Tim Jackson: That's because you live where it snows year-round.

Kendra Perry: I do. But I love the snow. I love. I love the ... Snow sucks I you don't do anything cool in it. If you just sit around and bitch about winter and you're like, "Oh, winter sucks," then yeah, snow sucks. But if you get out you can do so many cool things in the snow it's insane. You can ski, you can snowboard, you can go sledding, there's so much fun things. Once you get into it, once you find a snow sport, you're in love.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I love snowboarding, but if you go snowboarding anywhere around here it's like falling on cement.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, well you've got to come to British Columbia and ski some real BC powder, that is a game changer, that is orgasmic, my friend.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Well, then I'll have to look that up.

Christine: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, it's messed up.

Christine: Now you know my michochondria going-

Kendra Perry: Michochondria, good one.

Christine: Oh God, mitochondria, I cannot ... my brain. I think I have just dropped 12%.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Did you just combine German and English and another language?

Christine: It's my brain fog. I had a rough week and people.

Kendra Perry: All right, well, do we have anything else to cover today? We've covered a lot of random topics, which is fun. I like these episodes where we go where things take us, right?

Christine: Exactly, and I think there was super-helpful things there, and I just got a ton of ideas what we can add to our website.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Don't stress me out, my heart rate's going up.

Kendra Perry: Just can't handle the check.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I can't, I can't.

Christine: Oh good, we're such geeky people, I love it.

Kendra Perry: I know, I love the [crosstalk 00:46:23]-

Christine: All right, I think this has been awesome. People out there from our random train of thought episode, which still has been amazing, let us know what was the most interesting, random, surprising, whatever thing. Let us know why you are writing your five star iTunes review, and we will love you forever.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and before you shut down this podcast just take a screenshot, share it to your Instagram stories, tag 360HealthBizPodcast, and we will share it to ours, because we love IG stories. If you love them, then lets do it together.

Christine: Mention us. That's just a little tidbit, like you need to use the mention kind of icon, not just the app symbol but he actual mention because then we can do it. Otherwise, it's more difficult.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, totally, so there you go. All right guys, well thanks so much.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Whatever they just said.

Kendra Perry: He's like, "I don't know, what's Instagram story?"

Dr. Tim Jackson: Heart rate, heart rate.

Kendra Perry: Oh my God.

Dr. Tim Jackson: With social media I have an idea.

Kendra Perry: We're going to have to talk off-air, Tim.

Christine: Yeah, I'm absolutely ... Kendra, I would agree. Tim, we need to talk.

Kendra Perry: Well, thanks so much guys and thank you, Tim, so much for being here with us. This was awesome. It was super-fun to hang out and talk about health and business and all that nerdy shit. We love you guys and, as always, we will be back in two weeks time with another fantastic episode. Bye guys.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Thanks for having me.