3 Ways to Detect Mineral Deficiencies with Blood Testing

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As you’ve heard me say in the past, hair tissue mineral analysis is by far the best way to assess your client for mineral deficiencies. But you can still find plenty of hidden gems of information that you can get from your client's blood chemistry, which is great because it’s usually an easy test they can get from their medical doctor during a physical.

There are 3 particular markers that I use blood chemistry analysis for: low vitamin D, alkaline phosphatase and homocysteine.

What may come to a surprise to many is that low vitamin D levels are often linked to a magnesium deficiency. How you ask? Well, magnesium affects how the body is able to regulate calcium. Without magnesium, calcium has a really hard time staying in the bones, which can result in the buildup of calcium in the soft tissue. This in return lowers vitamin D raises calcium and the body does not want to be retaining more calcium when it doesn't have the minerals to keep it where it belongs.

Alkaline phosphatase levels are also a marker that can be found through blood tests. Alkaline phosphatase is the enzyme in the blood that helps break down proteins and when it’s low, it often means there is a zinc deficiency. When someone is low in zinc and low in low alkaline phosphatase, it typically means they are also struggling to produce sufficient stomach acid.

The third marker that tells you about mineral deficiency is homocysteine. When you see low homocysteine on a blood test, that generally means there is a boron deficiency. Boron helps regulate the inflammatory response in the body, and it also helps keep magnesium in the cell (see marker 1 about magnesium deficiency..see how this all coming together?!)

Now you understand a few of the markers to help assess mineral deficiency with blood chemistry. To get educated on the best assessment for mineral status in the body, I encourage using hair tissue mineral analysis. And lucky you - I've created a free intro series to hair mineral analysis which you can grab here.

TRANSCRIPT

Do you want to actually extract useful information from your clients blood chemistry? So, I'm Kendra from Kendraperry.net. By the end of this video, I'm going to show you three different markers on a blood chemistry that can help you assess for mineral deficiency.

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So in my opinion, hair tissue mineral analysis is by far the best way to assess your client for mineral deficiencies, but there's still a lot of really hidden gems and really useful information that you can get from your client's blood chemistry, which is pretty sweet because a lot of them already have them on hand from whenever they do a physical with their doctor. And by the end of this video, I'm going to teach you exactly what those markers are and how to address them.

So hair tissue mineral analysis or HTMA testing is my jam, but I actually love utilizing blood chemistry as well. So HTMA with blood chemistry actually gives you a really, really interesting look into a person's body when it comes to their mineral status.

But let's get into the blood chemistry. So, the first thing that you might see on a blood chemistry is low vitamin D levels. So, the functional range for Vitamin D or 25 hydroxy vitamin D is 60 to 80, okay? And if you're seeing below 60 vitamin D levels, what you might want to do is give that person vitamin D, but that actually doesn't necessarily tell you about vitamin D deficiency, it actually tells you about magnesium deficiency.

So, magnesium is one of the first minerals to go when people start getting mineral deficient. Once magnesium goes, it really affects how the body is able to regulate calcium, and what happens is without magnesium, calcium has a really hard time getting and staying in the bone. And when it's not in the bone, it doesn't have enough magnesium to get in the bone, you get this soft tissue calcification or the buildup of calcium in the soft tissue, which is the joints, the muscles, the hair, the organs. Bone spurs can also be a side effect of soft tissue calcification, as can plaque build up in the arteries.

So, if you don't have good magnesium levels, then calcium can't get to where it belongs. And so what does the body do? Well, it lowers vitamin D, because vitamin D raises calcium, and the body does not want the body to be retaining more calcium when it doesn't have the minerals to keep it where it belongs, because soft tissue calcification is a big issue. It actually makes the body age.

So when you see low vitamin D on a blood chemistry test, instead of giving vitamin D, support their magnesium levels instead. And what you want to do is recommend five times their body weight in pounds in milligrams. So, if they weigh a hundred pounds, they need 500 milligrams of magnesium a day.

Do not recommend citrate. I always recommend doing bisglycinate, glycinate or malate. My favorite product to use is from Jigsaw Health, and it's the SRT magnesium, so it's a time release magnesium malate, so it time releases over eight hours. So it allows a person to get more magnesium, without it causing diarrhea or loose stool.

Guys, and I would love to know are you using blood chemistry in your health coaching business? Let me know in the comments below. I would love to know.

The second marker that tells you about mineral deficiency is alkaline phosphatase. So, this is going to be a marker that you find on the comprehensive metabolic panel or the CMP, and you want alkaline phosphatase to be between 70 and 100. But if it's below 70, that actually indicates zinc deficiency. It's actually the only thing that it indicates, and what you're going to find is that most people have low alkaline phosphatase. Zinc deficiency is a very, very common thing, and it's a big deal because we need seek to not only have a healthy immune system and healthy skin, but we also need it to make stomach acid.

So typically, your people with low zinc and low alkaline phosphatase are also struggling to produce sufficient stomach acid. So you are going to want to supplement with zinc, but you do have to be cautious with zinc because zinc actually lowers sodium, and a lot of people are pretty bottomed out in sodium, so you don't want to go for a very hefty dose.

You go too high, you could also trigger a copper dump, or the dumping of several really dangerous metals. So, when it comes to zinc, I would not go over 15 milligrams. I would max out at 15 milligrams, and you want to go with a glycinate, a gluconate or something called OptiZinc.

The third marker that tells you about mineral deficiency is homocysteine. So, most practitioners are only getting concerned with high homocysteine. I would say the functional range for homocysteine is between 6 and 7.2. Now, if you have low homocysteine, that actually tells you about boron deficiency. Boron is incredibly important. It helps regulate the inflammatory response in the body, and it also helps keep magnesium in the cell. A lot of people are magnesium deficient these days, so if you're seeing low homocystine, your client needs boron.

Now, one of the easiest way to support this without having your client go out and buy supplements is actually to do a foot bath. You want to be using good water, good purified water, but you can put borax into the foot bath, and they can absorb the bond through the skin.

Now, if you're going to go the supplement route, you can go with a brand called Hakala labs. They make a boron in a 30 milligram tablet, and you want to start people with about a half of that, so they can actually cut that tablet in half and start with 15 milligrams and eventually work up to 30 milligrams.

You can also go with Source Naturals. They make the triple boron, but it's a much lower dose. It's actually most companies make a pretty low dose, so Source Naturals is around three milligrams, so you're going to have to have people taking about five capsules a day to get that 15 milligrams of boron.

All right, so now you understand a few of the markers to help assess mineral deficiency with blood chemistry. Now is probably a good time to actually get educated on the best assessment for mineral status in the body, which is hair tissue mineral analysis. So, I've created a free intro series to hair mineral analysis, and you can grab that video series by clicking the link below. Guys, and if you like this video, make sure to like it, leave via a comment and let me know what you learned. Share it with your fellow health coaches, and definitely subscribe to my channel so you don't miss a video when I post it every Thursday.