Tag Archives foronline health coach

Lead Magnet Examples for Health Coaches (5 HIGH-CONVERTING OPTIONS)

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What the F is a lead magnet?

A lead magnet is probably one of the most important things that you offer your ideal audience as a health coach. It can also be called a freebie or a free opt-in - basically it's something that you offer to your ideal audience of high value in exchange for their email address so you can build your email list. Unfortunately, not all lead magnets are made the same. Some of them work, and some will fail. In my new video I'm going to teach you the five highest converting lead magnets for health coaches. ​

My five years of running a business, I've created a ton of lead magnets, but what worked when I first started out doesn't work very well today. These days, my lead magnets have a very high conversion rate and I have easily built my email list without ads by about 10 to 15 subscribers per day.​

Before we consider which types of lead magnets work and which ones don't, we really need to consider how humans interact in the modern world. In 2019 people are busy AF. They describe themselves as busy, they wear a ton of hats, they have a ton going on at all times. You might even call them a bit distracted. What that really means is that people overextend themselves and they really lack free time, so if your lead magnet is going to bring new leads onto your email list, your lead magnet needs to align with today's busy world.

So first off, your lead magnet needs to be short and easy to consume. When I first started marketing online, e-books were a big thing. You could offer a free e-book and people would opt in, and there was a chance that they might actually read the entire e-book. E-books don't work anymore. Those are pretty outdated, and the reason is because of how people interact in their lives. They have a million things going on at all times. So if you offer a 30 or 50 or a hundred page e-book, people are going to feel pretty overwhelmed by that, and they might not even opt in to begin with. The chances of them actually finishing that e-book and getting to the end of it are slim to none. And remember, you actually do want people to complete your lead magnet. You really want to see all the value you can give. You want them to get all that great information, and of course you also want them to get to the end where you say, "Hey, if you like this information, you maywant to book a free call or join my group program."

So your lead magnet shouldn't take the reader longer than 5 to 10 minutes to actually get through it. Once you complete your lead magnet, read through it and time yourself. If it takes you longer than 10 minutes to get through it, it's too long and people aren't going to get there, so you should edit it down to hit that 5 to 10 minute mark.

Next, your lead magnet has to be super, super juicy. There's a good chance this is the first time this person is actually coming into contact with you and what you offer, so it needs to reel them in, and it needs to prove to them that you are worth following and worth paying attention to.
So with the lead magnet, it can be really good if you tell them something that they didn't know before, and of course this does rely on knowing who your audience member actually is. If you have people who are super new to their health, then teaching them something basic like to drink clean water and eat breakfast, might be something they haven't heard before. But if your audience are further along in their health journey, then they know to eat breakfast and drink clean water, so you'll need to beef it up and tell them something that they haven't heard before. It does come down to knowing who you're talking to.

The next thing you can do is offer them a quick win, so something that they can implement quickly that will get them a quick result. Imagine if they read your lead magnet, they did something that you told them to do, and then they actually got a result! They felt better, they had less brain fog, they had more energy, they felt better after waking up from a night's sleep. That would make them want to pay attention. That would really prove to them that you were someone to follow. ​

So what kind of lead magnets work best? There are five that tend to work the best in the health and wellness industry.

1) Cheat sheet
A cheat sheet is a very edited down version that kind of gives some quick information that they can refer to. Maybe it would be a quick energy cheat sheet. It would be a list of a few things that help them get more energy in any given day.

2) Checklist
Checklists convert super well because people love something they can check off. A checklist is quick and easy to consume, plus it doesn't take you that long to make. You don't want to be spending days and days and days making a lead magnet. It shouldn't take you that long to make. Maybe it's a bedtime routine checklist because you're niche is sleep so they can actually check off all the things that they should do before bed in order to get a good night's sleep​.

3) Quick guide
This is like the e-book idea, but edited down to be very, very quick. I love calling it a quick guide because it tells people up front that you don't need them to commit much time to actually get the information. So if you do have an e-book out there, edit it down, turn it into a quick guide, and make sure it only takes 5 to 10 minutes to consume.

4) Short video/short video series
Remember people have short attention spans, so you don't want to make it too involved, but a quick 10 to 15 minute video or maybe a quick video series that includes 3-5 minute videos, that can be a really good way to teach your ideal client about what they need to learn about first before they eventually want to take the step and start working with you.

5) Case study
I find this works really well for health and wellness. If you've had great results with clients and those people are willing to share their results with your people, you can create a case study. Maybe you go through one or two case studies where you show them, this person came to me with XYZ problem, this is what we did, and after this amount of time, this is the result they got and this is their testimonial.

Now go create your high quality lead magnet and let those email subscribers roll on in!

Webinars that Convert for Wellness Professionals (CLIENTS ON AUTOPILOT!)

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Have you been considering running a webinar to bring new clients in the door? Well you're in luck because in my new video I'm going to teach you a webinar format that converts AND will help you turn those prospective clients into paying clients.

I ran my health coaching business for five years, and during that time, I hosted many webinars - some failures and some successes. But what I found when it comes to running a webinar, is that there are five key ingredients for success. 

 1) Strategic focus
 2) Bribery
 3) Keep them short and sweet
 4) Urgency
 5) Q&A session

Let's start with step number one: strategic focus. Your webinar topic has to be virtually the same as the ultimate product or service that you are going to pitch or sell at the end of the webinar. That means that if you're selling a weight loss program, your webinar actually has to be specific to weight loss and not some other similar topic like body image or mindful eating. Your program or service should actually feel like the natural transition for viewers who want to go deeper after learning from your webinar. So using the example of weight loss, if you are selling a 12-week weight loss program, then maybe the title of your webinar is "Five Shocking Reasons You Can't Lose Weight & What to do About it". In this example, people who are interested in weight loss are going to be very interested in signing up for your webinar. And once you teach them why they aren't having the weight loss success that they desperately want and then you give them a few actionable tips and strategies. Naturally, those who are interested in getting bigger results are going to gravitate or at least be interested in the product or program that you are selling at the end of your webinar.

Number two is bribery. People are pretty distracted these days which means if you don't give people an incentive to stay the course of your webinar, there is a really good chance that they're going to get distracted by their phone, maybe someone coming over, and they're going to drop off and they're never going to get to your pitch at the end of the webinar. So you need to make it worth their while to stay, and nothing works better than what I call ethical bribery. This might be free access into the program you're selling, or maybe it's a free product that they would be interested in like a Vitamix or maybe it's a free 60-minute consultation with you. Whatever it is, you need to make it juicy - something that they're actually really going to want. And you need to make this really clear at the beginning of the webinar. You need to tell them, "Hey, for those of you who stay with me till the end, you can be entered to win this free thing." And usually how I do this, is I say a secret word at the end of the webinar that they can then email to my team to get entered into the contest. But of course, you don't want to give that secret word away until you have finished your pitch. Without bribery, there really just isn't the incentive to stay to the end of the webinar.

Number three is short and sweet. The biggest mistake I see a lot of people doing is that they overwhelm the viewer by giving away way too much information in their webinar. As much as you feel super passionate about the topic you are teaching, if you make it too long and you overwhelm the viewer, it's a sure thing that they're going to just drop off. The content of your webinars should share a maximum of three to five points and it needs to be completely related to your webinar topic and ultimately your product topic. I also recommend that you give them something actionable during your presentation that they can do right now in order to experience a quick win. If you give your viewer a quick win, they're going to be way more interested in potentially entering your program, or if they're not ready to buy it then, they will probably still follow you and potentially they could become a buyer in the future.

The fourth ingredient is urgency. If you want people to take action at the end of your webinar, you need to put just the little bit of pressure on them. Otherwise, they'll get distracted and totally forget to invest in your program even if they had the intention to do so. Some people call this a fast-acting bonus. Trust me, it works. This is where you give them incentive to actually take that urgent action. So this might be a discount code that expires at midnight, or it might be some juicy bonus that they can only get if they sign up in the next 48 hours. And you should always include this urgency or fast-acting bonus. Even if you have your cart open for 10 to 14 days, you want to give them incentive to actually act right away. Remember, you do want to make it juicy enough that they can't help but take that urgent action.

The last tip is the Q&A or the question and answer session. This is your time to shine and you should always include this at the end of your webinar. This allows viewers to connect with you personally and inquire about working with you further. So regardless of who is asking questions in the questions box or if maybe nobody is asking questions in the questions box, that is okay. I recommend coming prepared with a list of questions to pretend to ask that highlight the benefit of your program. And like I said, even if no one actually ask this, you want to fake it because this is actually doing your viewer a favor by giving them more information about your program. So for example, if you have a weight loss program, one objection might be from someone who says, "Hey, I'm plant-based, I'm a vegan. Does this program actually include recipes that I can eat?" And you're going to be like, "Yes, it does actually, all of the recipes can be modified to be vegan or plant-based." Another example would be, "Annie says she has fatigue along with weight loss. Will this program actually help her get more energy and lose weight at the same time?" And your response is going to be, "Yes, Annie, it absolutely will. The information taught in this program actually helps build overall health and people can see a resolution of lots of different symptoms including energy or brain fog or digestive issues." The question and answer is the time to help address questions that you believe your ideal might have when it comes to making that decision to work with you.

Now that you understand the five juicy ingredients of a high-converting webinar, maybe you're hungry for some more delicious tips to optimize your online business?! So make sure to sign up for my weekly business tips here. These are tips that are specific to your health coaching business and things that I saw success with, with running my own health coaching practice.

If you've got a program and you're wondering how to price it, then make sure to check out my video, Pricing Methods and Strategies for Your Signature Coaching Program!

How to Create a Signature Program in Your Wellness Business (THAT FILLS YOUR BANK ACCOUNT!)

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Let's start at the beginning. What is a signature program? A signature program is what your business is known for. It is a program that is branded to your specific niche that you sell to your ideal client. And remember, without something to sell, you don't have a business at all. You may have a brand, you may have an online presence, but unless you are selling something, you actually don't have a business.

I see a ton of coaches making the huge mistake of selling one off sessions or single sessions. So basically they are exchanging an hourly rate for something like a 60 minute session with no commitment from the client to go any further than that 60 minute session. This is not a successful business model for health coaches. And that is because typically as a health coach, you are actually not licensed, which means that people's extended health benefits will not cover your services. One off sessions actually require very minimal commitment from your client, which means that you have way less of an opportunity to actually get them results and to actually prove the method that is going to get them that result. And without the ability to get your clients results and ultimately get testimonials, you don't have a proven method, which means that no one's really going to seek you out for anything.

If we look at things from a money perspective, getting enough clients in the door to actually pay your bills and have a little bit extra enjoy your life is virtually impossible. Let's say you want to hit $5,000 a month in your business and let's just say you charge $100 an hour for a one hour session. That means you need to sell 51 hour sessions every single month in order to hit that $5,000 a month goal. And remember, when you sell one off sessions, there's very little commitment on the part of the client involved. So there's a good chance that many of those people who you are seeing in that month, you may not see them again at all, or maybe not again for several months. And that means you need to bring a lot of new clients into the door and have to work really hard on marketing to attract those clients to you.

If this hasn't convinced you yet, here are 3 reasons why you NEED a signature program.

1) it gives your business the ability to sell something that is way more valuable than just simply a one off session. It gives your brand an identity and something that you are known for.
2) it requires your clients to pay a much higher price point, which means ultimately they are going to be more committed to working with you, which means you have more opportunity to actually get them a result and actually get those testimonials that will help you bring more clients in the door.
3) you actually have to get way less clients to hit that 5K a month, which means that you are less likely to be overwhelmed, you're less likely to burn out, and you don't have to juggle a million clients at once. And if this sounds good to you, give me a hell yes in the comments below.

Okay, so let's discuss how you actually create a signature program. So first things first you need to ask yourself the question, what is the ONE thing that I solve for my ideal client? Not five things and not 10 things, not 15 things. So you want to think of the one result that you could get for your ideal client that they would consider a huge win and they would rave about to all their friends.

When it comes to naming your signature program, you want to make the name of the program very specific so that the name speaks for itself. So when you say the name of your program, people know exactly what type of result they're actually going to get from that program.

The next thing you want to do is you want to determine how long your signature program is going to be. Now there is no secret sauce for the ideal length of a signature program, but don't make it too long or too overwhelming because that could actually turn off your ideal client from purchasing. I find three to six months tends to be best for a signature program. If you're doing just standard traditional health coaching, three months works pretty well, but if you are a type of coach who's running labs, then I would probably go on the longer end of that maybe more four to six months to allow for the time it takes to send out labs and receive results. And of course some of the errors that come along with working with labs.

And the final thing you want to do is determine what your signature program is actually going to include. How many sessions will you offer? What types of tools and resources will you give to your clients? What type of support are they going to receive from you? And don't make the mistake of adding too many sessions into your program to try to increase the value. People are actually pretty busy these days and they worry less about the time they get in a program. What they care about most is the results.

All right, so now go create your bad ass signature coaching program! 

How to Take Your Health Practice From In-Person to Online with Dr Tim Jackson

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Are you a practitioner that primarily focuses on in-person sessions but looking to take your practice online? Whether you’re looking to move entirely online, or have both a brick and mortar and online business, your online presence is absolutely essential. If your practice is perceived as a brick and mortar, how do you take that perception and make people think of looking for you in an online setting? It’s a tough question for many! The quick answer - create content, bring a lot to the table and bring a different skillset that can scale online. That’s where Dr. Tim Jackson comes in. 

Dr. Tim Jackson, DPT received his undergraduate degree in Health science and chemistry from Wake Forest University in 2003. He completed his Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT) from the Medical University of SC in 2009.

Realizing that manual therapy and orthopedic care helped only some of his patients, he began studying functional and environmental medicine, as well as digestive health, in an effort to help others achieve wellness. Dr. Tim is educated in nutritional biochemistry, digestive health and its systemic effects, as well as functional endocrinology. He recently completed the Spine portion of the Active Release Technique methodology, a system that addresses musculoskeletal trigger points and helps to expedite the healing process. Currently, Dr. Tim is working on his Functional Diagnostic Nutritionist certification.

We talk about many different topics in this episode including the link between chronic infection and mitochondrial issues, but our main focus and what everything ended up coming back to was how your take your practice into an online setting.

It’s no lie that the digital world serves the most people. You can connect with people that live down the block from you in your home town or live halfway across the world. This is the new way to connect and grow your business. Tune into. How Dr. Jackson did this, and how you can too!


Tools discussed in this episode:
Anchor app
healthtalksonline
Functional Diagnostic Nutrition Course

Grab our Ultimate Health Coaching Tool Kit complete with our top picks for platforms plus our sample contract and intake form: http://360healthbizpodcast.com

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TRANSCRIPT


Christine: Hello again and welcome to this new episode of The 360 Health Biz Podcast, and I'm super-excited, it's beautiful weather outside, we're in April, winter is behind us I hope. And with me is my wonderful, beautiful, totally kick-ass, badass Kendra Perry, co-host.

Kendra Perry: Hello.

Christine: The co-hostest with the mostest, and we have a super-exciting guest today, friend of mine, huge, long conversations with about all kinds of things, Dr. Tim Jackson, so I'm very, very excited to talk about how to take your offline practice to online, kind of things that you encounter, so this is especially interesting for those of you who will have a traditional brick and mortar business and who want to evolve into the online space, which we love at this podcast.

Christine: Now, don't forget, as always you will be able to follow on our blog and you will also find us on YouTube, you will find us obviously on Audio, but you can also watch us on our YouTube channel, so that's always fun to do. Then we are super-excited because as you know, each time when you learn something exciting I'll ask you to please, please, please leave us a five star review on iTunes and someone did that, not today actually, we apologize in advance because we kind of didn't followup and forgot to check.

Kendra Perry: Get up.

Christine: No.

Kendra Perry: I've been checking but yeah, iTunes doesn't really bring everything into one so they're kind of everywhere so we missed this one. This is actually from a couple of months ago, so Cathy Morris, we love you. We are sorry we have not read your review until now but we really appreciate it. She left us a short and sweet [crosstalk 00:01:39] that says, "These ladies are wonderful, true, heartfelt educators. They really want to help with their heath and plans. I love listening to them. Thank you Cathy for that review that you left two months ago, we really appreciate it. It's warming our heart now.

Christine: We do, we do, we totally do. Thank you so, so much. And if you want to receive as much love from us as we just sent over to Cathy, hope you feel all warm and tingly, then please go and head over to iTunes right now and leave us a review. So hit pause, leave us a review, and we'll be making sure to give you a shout out next episode.

Kendra Perry: Sooner than two months from now.

Christine: It's so typical of us to miss that kind of stuff, you know how it is.

Kendra Perry: We're disorganized gong shows, so-

Christine: No real surprise there, right? Unless you send us money. We will take that gladly, immediately-

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and then it'll be on there in [crosstalk 00:02:30]-

Christine: We have a Patreon page, by the way. Go to our website 360healthbizpodcast.com and you can donate to support our cause. All right, so without further ado, Dr. Tim Jackson, super-excited to have you here. You have a massively impressive biography with all kinds of degrees and all kinds of diplomas and education, so it's basically you just read it and you're like, "Oh my God, your brain must be huge," so in a nutshell, who are you, what do you do?

Dr. Tim Jackson: My doctorate's in physical therapy and rehabilitation, my undergrad is in health science and chemistry. I started out doing orthopedic rehabilitation and sports medicine, and I kind of knew all along that I wanted to incorporate functional medicine aspects into it, just because a lot of times your musculoskeletal pain, if it's not 100% caused by internal issues it's 80% caused by internal issues, so I can adjust your spine and mobilize your elbow, but why are those things inflamed? I figured out that I was pretty good at functional medicine and there weren't many people doing it, I was doing it before there was really a name for it and there were a ton of people doing orthopedics.

Dr. Tim Jackson: And so I work with people and I'm working on narrowing down my ideal client avatar, but I have everyone from professional athletes to kids on the autism spectrum. A lot of people will say, "How can those two populations have anything in common?" Mitochondrial dysfunction, gut issues, so there's actually a lot they have in common, and so I work with clients from all over the world as part of my Heal Your Body Program, working in layers versus one-time consults.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I also do practice consulting with traditional medical clinics that are looking to incorporate functional medicine, IV nutrition, functional lab testing, supplementation and nutritional consultation.

Kendra Perry: Man, how do you get it all done? It sounds like a ton of things, wearing tons of hat.

Christine: I'm just exhausted listening to that.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I sleep like a boss, that's how.

Christine: Secret. If you don't, get in touch with me.

Kendra Perry: Shameless plug.

Christine: Totally. All right, so I think it's super-interesting because I'm pretty sure we have ... I find that so many people who work with physical therapy who start to shift into the functional medical corner, and I do think that you just told us that you work with people all over the world. I guess it just is like a change of thinking that you actually do that, because I guess when you start out you do have the typical idea of a brick and mortar business, where people come see you and, as you said, you kind of ... I don't know what you do, you press and prod and I don't know what else you do.

Kendra Perry: Poke.

Christine: In order to get them back into shape, so I can imagine that people will say, "Okay, so how is this dude going to help me with his webcam, you know?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right. Sure, I mean it's the same sort of principle as osteopathic medicine chiropractic. There are plenty in those professions that don't do manual therapy or hands-on, so I get a lot of emails with people asking, "Oh, can I come to you in person?" You can, it's not really going to change what we do. You still need a local primary care physician who can prescribe medication if needed, and who can you see for emergency issues, and physical exams and things of that nature.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I work more on looking at biochemical and biophysical imbalances and finding those pathways that are congested or block and optimizing them. And so it doesn't really matter where you are, to a certain extent lab testing is different in different parts of the world. But for example, in Canada, good luck getting a Reverse T3 tested, it's not going to happen.

Kendra Perry: I can get it done. I can get it done. I have a great naturopath, but yeah, it's a pain in the ass. They send it away and then you wait forever, and then they always forget it and you're like, "I paid for this. I paid for this. Give it to me." [inaudible 00:07:05]

Dr. Tim Jackson: Exactly. Yeah, I mean a lot of it I've kind of moved since when I started practicing I mean I was definitely more heavily focused on the supplementation. Of course, I still use supplements but I try to give people the best return on their investment, things like far infrared sauna, red light therapy, my molecular hydrogen machine over here. Those are things that are going to continue to work for you month after month without having to purchase a new one.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and so how do you use near infrared and far infrared sauna therapies? I'm so obsessed with light therapy. I've got my Joovv light, I've got my sunlight and sauna, are you using that primarily for detox and mitochondrial function?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, so I have the REDjuvenator, the ... Well, we could talk about that another time, but I wouldn't repurchase it, but it has red and near-fared. I use it for collagen production, [inaudible 00:08:08] 21, and-

Kendra Perry: He looks 21. Get on YouTube and watch the video so you can check him out.

Christine: Yeah, it's actually very true. I might have to get that machine, even if it's not working for you totally, but just does half I'm in, sign me up.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Hey, it's working for me. Have you seen this face?

Christine: Oh yeah.

Kendra Perry: He's glowing.

Christine: He's absolutely. I'm sure he doesn't have the green filter on like we do, you know?

Kendra Perry: We're cheating.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I don't even know how to do that, so no, I don't have that on. But I use the red light therapy mostly for mitochondrial boosting, collagen production is kind of a side benefit, but a lot of the products out there don't have the power output that they should to achieve a therapeutic affect. But it's one of those things that you can incorporate, your whole family can use. You do have to be careful with, and I know we don't want to get too off-topic, but in people who are really toxic even five minutes of stimulating the mitochondria any time you increase cellular energy production you're going to turn on a lot of things that were turned off. And so you just have to be careful of that.

Christine: Do you sometimes have clients ... How do you do this exactly? Do they have to see you are you going to tell a client, "Look, I do recommend that you do this," and then you tell them how to do it? Or how does that work?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, I mean, it's all part of a comprehensive program and I take into their account their budget and they're already doing. Some people who've come to me are already doing red light therapy and a lot of other biohacks. Other times I may recommend two supplements, gluten-free diet and far infrared sauna. Because I could recommend a zillion things, but it's just going to overwhelm them and you have to kind of meet people where they are and let them experience some success and get that momentum going. If you do that, then they'll buy-in, and I've found that if you can do something right off the bat that really makes them feel it, then they'll buy-in to everything else.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Someone told me once, "Give them a little bit of what they want and a lot of what they need." They might come to me for anti-aging but I might look at chronic infection, and they don't necessarily understand the connection but I do.

Christine: Sort of what I do, the niche is sleep but it's never just sleep, it just like one of the symptoms so it's exactly what you're saying, yeah.

Kendra Perry: It's all connected and I think people have a hard time wrapping their head around that because we've been raised in this sort of compartmentalized medical system, and no matter how often or how much I try to explain it to certain people they still don't get it, so you just exactly have to give them what they want, and then they're like, "Oh, this is great. I want to take things to the next level." Right?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right.

Kendra Perry: And so you've obviously been around for a very long time. You were with functional medicine before it was called functional medicine, probably dates you a little bit to the audience, but what did that transition look like when you were seeing people in clinic, in office when you realized you could utilize the Internet to reach more people around the world?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah. I mean, I had been on the different forums and before Facebook and social media was popular, the health and medical forums were really popular and so I was on those back in the day, but I always realized that there were people locally who would go pay cash to see someone else versus coming to our clinic and using their insurance. So I think the dilemma is people want to transition into the online space but they don't want to up their game. You can't just transition and not have it on advanced skillset or something unique that you bring to the table.

Christine: That's a good point, yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, when you're transitioning or when I was transitioning, I just tried to put out good information and I definitely didn't know anything about SEO or any of that, and it just got shared really. I have medical doctors now that refer to me, other clinicians, acupuncturists, et cetera, but I think even if you're going to have a brick and mortar practice you still need to have a good online presence.

Dr. Tim Jackson: For example, when I lived in Atlanta the owned of the clinic where I worked part-time, he didn't understand that you can't just put up a sign and expect people to show up. I mean, there's a million functional medicine clinics in Atlanta and if someone googles, "Relevant functional medicine terms," you want to be at the very top. And so I think having an online presence is important, whether you're all virtual or you're split or all brick and mortar.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, I mean it's a really good point. Nothing drives me more crazy then when I'm trying to find more information about a business or a menu and they don't have a website or a Facebook page that they update, and I'm just like, "How?" I don't understand. How do you not have any sort of online, even if you're a local business, right? People traveling to the area, people ... For me, if it's not convenient, I'm out. Gone.

Christine: Me too. If it takes me more than two seconds to have a nice mobile-friendly page I'm out, and it's so annoying. Because okay, I'm just in the process of getting a kitten so I'm Googling breeders. You wouldn't believe how many of them have like wicks pages from 1995 or something like that. It's not mobile-friendly, you need to zoom into everything and press buttons and things, and I'm just like, "No, no, no, no, no." I would love to actually write them emails and say, "Look, I'm going to do your website for free because this is too frustrating."

Kendra Perry: And your next career is building cat websites.

Christine: Totally, there's a huge market there, I think.

Kendra Perry: I think there is.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, and they're also seeing my friend who is a psychiatrist.

Christine: See? There we go, mixed business. But I find we are all the same kind of age, we're actually all 56, we just look amazing to get because we have saunas and stuff. I think we are actually really lucky because we are belonging to the millennium breed, but we're still a generation ... One of millennium parts we remember the analog world but also the digital, so I think it really helps because if we have people, like the person who unfortunately was inflexible who ran the clinic that you worked at who were just totally analog, they really have a hard time understanding the digital. I think our generation is actually super-lucky because we understand how they think, and yet we grew up figuring all this crap out because it was basic.

Christine: I remember the first chatroom I was in was actually an ISC chatroom where you had to program everything, it was basically like a dot kind of an [inaudible 00:15:30] something. I didn't know it was that at the time, with my 14 years. But we had to figure it all out, so I think that makes us really techy in a way, if you're interested. You also have people of our generations who are not, but at the same time we really do get the analog thinking as well.

Christine: I find that that is really a gift in a way, because we kind of also know what other people are looking for. So some people still just look for signs, but it's translating that into Google as in saying, "Look, you are actually on a street. You Google ranking is the biggest billboard in town, in a way, so if you're listening and you are a couple of generation ahead of us and you just don't dig this digital stuff, really one of my pieces of advice would be just open your mind and you have to then hire someone who does it for you.

Christine: Because I think there is absolutely no way that you can get served the most people possible if you don't have an online presence, even if you're not ready to take your complete business online. But if you do have a business that people perceive as being a brick and mortar business, so for example I perceive someone who does osteopathy physical therapy to be a hands-on business. How do you take that perception for people even to think about looking for that online, because I would never consider it an online business? How do you do that for people to actually understand that they can work with that online?

Christine: You talked a little bit about creating content, so I would be interested to know a little bit about how that opened doors for people worldwide to find you and to actually even get the idea to hire someone in that area of expertise online, versus going and looking for a brick and mortar close by.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Well, I think, I mean all the content that I've produced has been functional medicine. None of it has been orthopedic related. It's just like with osteopaths or chiropractors who don't adjust or they just do nutritional consultations, et cetera. If someone wants manual therapy or an adjustment, et cetera, of course they need to see someone in person, but I just made sure that everything I talked about was functional medicine related, neuro immune related, gut health, hormones, et cetera and so no one ever really perceived me as this orthopedic manual therapy guy.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, I've just focused on putting out content about mitochondria and all those other topics in functional medicine and red light therapy, and so when you put that out there and hope that people find you, and yeah.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, it seems like if you do do manual therapy of some sort and you want to go online, I guess it depends ... Like you said, you need to bring a lot to the table or you need to have a different skillset. Where I live there's a massage therapy school, and so there's a ton of massage therapists in my town and they're always three years in they're stoked on it, and three years in they're just like, "I can't scale up. I don't know how to scale up my business," because they can only do so many massages, right, in a day or they burn out.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right.

Kendra Perry: And so I've been thinking a lot about them and I'm like, "You need some sort of subset of skills that you could bring online, or something that you can teach to bring online or otherwise, yeah, if you just do physical therapy you really can only hit so high and they're you're stuck."

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right. Yeah, I mean it's just like with chiropractors adjusting people. If that's all you do, I mean it's going to wear on your body a lot and there's reason why you don't see very many old doctors or physiotherapy or doctors of chiropractic, and it is very energy intensive, I mean especially if you want to get good results to do soft tissue release, manipulation, that sort of thing. I mean, I would often break out in a sweat just working on a patient.

Dr. Tim Jackson: And so that kind of stuff if people want a physical examination or a movement examination, I mean I can do that virtually and look at what reflexes are integrated or not and how their movement patterns are, and a lot of times it involves resolving inflammation and other functional medicine root cause stuff.

Christine: Yeah. If you had to do it again would you start out with physical therapy again or would you say, "Hell no, I would just go straight into functional medicine?"

Dr. Tim Jackson: Well, I mean that's the thing. People always ask me about going to school for functional medicine and there is no school for functional medicine. I don't care what people say, I'm sure I'll piss a lot of people off but I do that anyways. Naturopaths did not-

Christine: Welcome to the club, dude. [crosstalk 00:20:49]

Dr. Tim Jackson: Naturopaths did not own functional medicine, okay? Let's get that out there. The Institute of Functional Medicine doesn't own functional medicine, and so someone told me, "Just buy a ticket to play the game." I'd probably just get my FDN, honestly. I mean, why go to school for eight years? I mean, you know?

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and I think that's maybe the post that we reconnected on Facebook on, it was someone who was posting about the University of Functional Medicine and you said something about, you're like, "Why waste $30 grand when you could just take one of Bryan Walsh's course and learn so much more?" And I think I was like, "Hell, yeah," or something like that and that's kind of where I chimed in. But yeah, it's so true. I see a lot of people spending so much money on traditional education in [inaudible 00:21:34] functional medicine, but in the end, I mean the great thing about ...

Kendra Perry: You mentioned the FDN course. Both me and Christine have done that course and then we love it because it gives us the ability to order the labs and actually get in the game. But a lot of people who've done some of this more expensive functional medicine education, if they're on license they still can't order labs, so what's the point?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right, right. Exactly. And, I mean ultimately the stuff that you learn, the most important stuff I've learned has been me kind of piecing together things. Someone might hear me on a podcast or read an article, but they don't necessarily appreciate that it took five years to put all that together, it didn't just show up.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, yeah. Yeah, it so true. It's so complex and everyone's like, "Oh, what's your education?" I'm like, "Sure, I've got all these letters beside my name but most of them don't mean anything and haven't contributed at all to my skillset, whatsoever." And a lot of what we do is just working clinically, working with clients, speaking with other practitioners, spending our extra time in the deep dark corners of Club Med and looking at shit, right? People don't get that. You're like, "Can I put hours of looking at shit beside my name?"

Christine: Yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Actually I just saw a new ... she calls herself a nutritionist website, and under her credentials she had a list of the articles she had read, and I'm like, "There's not enough bandwidth for the number of articles that I've read."

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine: Yeah, I probably don't even remember all of them, that's true. That's true.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: I find the little people ... yeah, go ahead.

Dr. Tim Jackson: No, I mean I just think it's silly that people look for certain letters to mean certain things, like they think, "Oh, if you're an optometrist then you can't do functional medicine," or, "If you're a dentist you can't do functional medicine." Why not?

Christine: Yeah, totally. And I find that's the first question I will usually get when I do talks or anything, it's like so people are looking at me, they're like, "So are you a doctor then?" You know? Or they're like that's the first question I always get, "So do you have a medical license?" Or, "Are you a doctor then?" And it's like, "No, but I have doctors sending me a lot of clients because they're just stuck at a certain point and they know that I get results. I work completely differently."

Christine: But it used to bother me, it used to really piss me off, like if you don't have the MD or the doctor in front of your name it's like okay, there's no cred in a way. I think it is shifting because a lot of people just know just through their own experience that there's a lot of boundaries in the traditional MD world and that it's just more for emergency cases. If you are an emergency, obviously it's the best thing that happened to us but, if not, very often everything is fine even though you feel like shit.

Christine: I found that is still something that people need to get used to, that you don't necessarily have to be an MD in order to be great at functional medicine.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, when people ask- Sorry, go ahead.

Kendra Perry: Go ahead. You go.

Dr. Tim Jackson: When people ask me if I'm an MD I say, "No, I'm your doctor's doctor," which in a lot of cases is true. Which in a lot of cases I true. I mean, I have probably five or six MDs now as clients, so that's my response.

Christine: That's [crosstalk 00:25:06].

Kendra Perry: Totally. And I've spent a bunch of time training licensed practitioners, I do a big focus on hair mineral analysis and just ran a course. I had a couple of doctors in there, a couple of naturopaths, a couple of dietitians and then a bunch of health coaches. But yeah, it's like I think that barrier with the letters is breaking down a little bit. I feel like people are caring less and less, but I think it also when you're starting out, when you're unlicensed people feel really maybe inferior or they feel like they need to keep upgrading their education rather than just getting out there, and getting clients and doing the work. Because that's really what makes you a good practitioner. It's not the education or the letters, it's having clinical experience and actually working with the people.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Absolutely. Definitely. Well said.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine: Tell us bit about with all the experience that you had working with clients online all over the place, what would be your top three things that you see over and over again? And what are some of the things that were maybe surprising after you started to transition from what you started out of, more in physical therapy to functional medicine? What are the three things that stuck in your head where you were like, "I wouldn't have thought this, but I see this over and over and over again."

Dr. Tim Jackson: Well, I shouldn't say this surprised me, but I was always fascinated with the immune system and chronic infections, and even with orthopedic type stuff, people with bilateral knee pain they've found mycoplasma antigen antibody complexes in the synovial fluid in the joint. Yeah, I can mobilize your knee and release the soft tissues that connect into the meniscus, but it's really an inflammatory immune issue, and that really applies to all orthopedic situations. But whether people know it or now, and everyone's worried about getting the flu and an acute infection, when the reality is the stealth chronic infections that hang around and get into the brain, and the nervous system, the heart, the blood vessels, the liver, those are what you should be concerned about because they create a constant inflammatory cascade that's going to manifest differently in everyone.

Dr. Tim Jackson: The three of us may all get infected with the same pathogen, Kendra may have headaches, you may have sleep issues, and I'm just making funny of you to the sleep, and you may have-

Christine: I thought you'd say diarrhea, but it's fine. I prefer the sleep issue.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yes, diarrhea-

Christine: Loose poop.

Dr. Tim Jackson: ... we'll go with that. And I may have an elevated heart rate, so I would say that chronic infections would be number one. That's something that most people are dealing with whether they realize it or not, and we have a world of underperforming people, and a lot of times they kind of chalk it up to, "Oh, I'm just not smart," or, "I'm just not this or that," and-

Christine: Just getting old.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, a lot of being controlled by things that they've just never been taught to look at or look for. I would say the chronic infections, of course the mitochondrial issues. If you can boost the mitochondria everything works better, and then the circadian rhythm and environmental health. I kind of group indoor air quality, I deal a lot with mold toxicity, and that directly drops blood flow to the frontal lobe in the brain in addition to impacting various aspects of your immune system.

Dr. Tim Jackson: The chronic infection, the mitochondria, because when people hear mitochondria they think energy, they think, "Oh, go work out," but they don't realize that everything, like the thoughts that I'm thinking right now, that requires energy production, my heart beating requires energy production, and so everything in your body will suffer when energy production suffers.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I tell people at the end of the day we'll do functional lab testing, but the two best tests are what's your body temperature and what's your sex drive?

Kendra Perry: Very cool.

Dr. Tim Jackson: You know? Because nature never wants to reproduce anything that's weaker, it only wants to reproduce things that are stronger and have more vitality. And so if you have low libido, when people and ... I don't want to call anyone out, but these fertility clinics popping up everywhere when you just bypassed that process, you're asking for trouble.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, I totally agree. I see that all the time. I work with women and I see just so many women going through yeah, all the crazy fertility treatments. They haven't been able, they've been trying for 10 years and it's just like they're doing in vitro, they're doing the fertility drugs, and they're just forcing these babies out of the body that doesn't actually want them to have a baby because they're not quite healthy enough. I think that's a big think.

Kendra Perry: I mean, it's a tough topic because women, they really want it, it's a very emotional thing. It's a tough one. It's hard to convince women sometimes, especially when they're older, when they're in their later 30s early 40s and they feel like they're running out of time to just focus on health first and not do the IVF or do the crazy fertility hormones that just make you dump eggs like a motherfucker.

Christine: Yeah, nuts. And nobody asks you-

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, I get-

Christine: ... about your energy levels or anything like that. Because I've gone through, not all the way, but the beginning stages of those treatments when we tried to have a second one, thank God we didn't, but nobody asks you these questions, like no one. It's crazy to me but it doesn't matter. It's really about okay, we're still very lucky in Luxembourg because our insurance actually covers everything, our national health insurance, so it's still different but it's still, "Okay, you have this problem, hence we're going to do this process." Nobody talks to you about diet, nobody talks to you about your energy levels, nobody talks to you about anything that might have to do that your natural body is just not up to it, because producing a little human is pretty complex, you know?

Kendra Perry: It's a big fucking deal.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right. Yeah, and to piggyback off what Kendra said, I get a fair number of emails from women who are in their late 30s, early 40s, and they're like, "Dr. Tim, I've got to get pregnant yesterday," and I'm like, "Well, just pump the brakes for a minute and give me six months and I promise you it will pay off a lot in the long-term, verus trying to fix stuff after the fact."

Kendra Perry: Yeah, yeah. And I'm always amazed, I've worked with people who they're so burnt out, they're so exhausted, they have no energy, they don't sleep well, they're literally burnt out on the floor and they're like, "I want to have a baby." I'm like, "That is crazy. How? How are you going to do that and how are you going to raise a child when you're that fucking tired?" It's just [crosstalk 00:32:15]-

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right, yeah. I agree with you 100%. It's kind of like people that have two kids and they can't parent them well, so let's have a third.

Christine: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, I know. Eww.

Christine: Thank God we're here tooting our horn. No, but it's very true. I mean, there's such a shift in paradigm having this information out, and I think part of it is because we do need to put that information out in order to be found and in order to run our businesses. On the one hand, yes, it's to the good for the people because we want them to learn more. On the other hand, it's just quite for us being in business it's important too, so it's really this two-way street but it's a win-win situation in the end, I reckon.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right, absolutely. Yeah, I mean I'm trying to become a jetsetter like you and just fly all over the place and live in luxurious resorts.

Christine: October, Bali people, 2019. Check it out. Self-promo, I'm sorry. I cannot help it.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, you're on fire today. You're just like, "I'm going to promote myself all episode long."

Christine: There's so many opportunities. What am I supposed to do?

Kendra Perry: You got to take it. You got to take it where you can get it.

Christine: Yeah. No, but I mean, it's what an online business is in the end. I think you have to give yourself a little bit of a nudge in order to be visible, it's not easy for everyone, and I think you have to do it in the way that suits you. Kendra and I, we obviously love the camera and we're like, "Hi," it's grim stories and all kind of witches talk, but other people are not. I think, for those, it's really a lot better that you create written content, and I think that's what you do mainly too, right?

Dr. Tim Jackson: What kind of content, sorry?

Christine: Written content.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Oh, written. Yeah. I mean, it's not that I don't like the camera. I do a ton of podcasts and summit interviews, I just hadn't gotten my lazy butt around to filming myself yet. Maybe I can talk to you guys off-air about what camera I need. But yeah, I want it to make me even younger and even more muscular, so-

Kendra Perry: We just need to show you how to use the zoom filter. Really, without the zoom filter, it is the morning, I just rolled out of bed, first coffee, I'm haggard, but the zoom filter it cleans me right up.

Christine: [crosstalk 00:34:45]. No, I mean [inaudible 00:34:48].

Dr. Tim Jackson: You look like you're in a studio right now Christine. Are you in some kind of-

Christine: Yeah, I have my studio set up. I was recording. What was I recording? Oh, my introduction to the website. I redid that, so yeah. I've been doing some video, more pro stuff, but it didn't turn out the way I wanted to. I may have to do it again. Yeah, sometimes I ... I love this stuff, I love [inaudible 00:35:10], I love ... I spend shitloads of money on that stuff, but I think it's to each their own, right? But-

Dr. Tim Jackson: I, personally, would rather have an aneurysm than deal with that stuff.

Kendra Perry: See? Oh my God. Really?

Christine: It's not [crosstalk 00:35:26]-

Dr. Tim Jackson: Biochemistry, that doesn't stress me out. Pathophysiology, that doesn't stress me out. You start talking about metatags and H1, H2, and my HPA is just choo, choo, choo.

Kendra Perry: Just gone.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, I have zero patience for that.

Christine: I do have a question though, because you just mentioned that you do lots of summits and lots of podcasts, so let's talk a little bit about that. Do you think this has helped your mastery with your business? Is this ... Because I know it's such a trend and so many people have done it, especially you people listening to this, it's about how can you make your coaching business or health practice more successful. I think you have these huge companies like what are they called? Health Talks Online-

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah.

Christine: ... and all these huge, huge, huge summit and I had my own summit a couple of years ago and you were actually an expert on that, and my list grew hugely, my email list, but I lost pretty much all of those people again, so as soon as I pitched the something. I'm wondering, has it been successful for you?

Dr. Tim Jackson: I think it has. People end up following my work and reading my articles. They may overtime become clients immediately, it may be two years down the road but just to give you an example. I was a coffee shop in Sedona, Arizona, and two separate people who didn't know each other came up and they were like, "Hey, weren't you on the Bulletproof Executive podcast?" And I was like, "Yeah, you watch that?"

Christine: Wow, pretty big deal.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, that's [crosstalk 00:37:03]-

Christine: I've never had that happen to me, there you go.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Well, that's just because you're a household name already, so ... But yeah, I mean I think it has. I haven't nurtured the opt-in email list because, again, all that stuff just stresses me out.

Christine: Mm-hmm (affirmative). I don't have a [crosstalk 00:37:19].

Dr. Tim Jackson: If I can pay someone to turn on my computer I probably would. That's just the reality of it. But the summits, I've never hosted a summit. I've been on, I think, nine or 10 and I think that did help me get a fair number of clients. But, like you said, people want ... in this day and age they're spoiled in terms of content and information. The other day just to give you a quick example, I made a post that was again to you, there's probably 1% of the world that knows this and it was about THC depleting potassium. Someone responded, "Where are your citations?" And I'm thinking, "Okay, yeah. Let me just stop seeing patients and I'll be a librarian and I'll start posting those links. That's what I'll do all day."

Dr. Tim Jackson: It gets kind of ridiculous and there's so much content out there you have to just kind of be consistent with it, I guess, and consistent with your messaging, and get in front of the right people because a lot of the people that I've met that are world famous, they definitely don't know the most they're just really good at marketing.

Christine: Yeah, and I think that's an issue a little bit in our ... As you say, people are very spoiled and it is a bit of an issue because you need to market yourself in order to get ads there but, at the same time, you need to have a quality service so it is tricky, definitely.

Kendra Perry: But I think what you just said, Tim, just kind of summed up how to have a successful online business, you were like be consistent, create consistent content, and I think it was create valuable content. It was something along those lines, I just kind of brain farted on a few of those things. But yeah, I feel like people want ... They're like, "Okay, well what's the strategy? How do I make it? Tell me the sexy stuff," and it's like, "Be consistent," and everyone's like, "Uh, what?" But it's so true. You just need to be consistent. You just need to keep showing up, you need to keep spreading your message, which is actually, I think, the other thing you said there.

Kendra Perry: Keep telling your story, spreading your message, be consistent, provide valuable content and don't give up, really. That's what it comes down to, I think.

Christine: Yeah, yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, and if you have flaunt it. I mean, I know so many that they don't really know very much but they charge a hefty penny. So hey, if you can't beat them, join them. Maybe I'll start doing shirtless podcasts.

Christine: You'd actually have an awesome podcast. If you just recorded what you wrote, all our blog posts and everything you know, it would be an amazing podcast, actually.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Maybe I can fly to Luxembourg and do it in your studio there.

Christine: That would be totally worth it. Kendra, we need to make an episode on how to do podcasts and what kind of [crosstalk 00:40:19].

Kendra Perry: yeah, totally.

Christine: I was just thinking that. I wrote it on my notepad where I wrote, "Hire Jamie Jensen, and do a [crosstalk 00:40:28] podcast."

Kendra Perry: Yeah, well I think podcasts are a great way to get out there. And I mean, me personally, I've said this a lot, but I don't consume video content because I don't have fucking time. When I'm off my computer I'm moving around, I'm getting shit done, I'm out on my bike so I listen to an obscene amount of podcasts in a day, I'm always listening to them. I don't really listen to music, so it's a good way to get in your ideal client's ears while they're in their car or on their run, or whatevs.

Christine: Yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right.

Christine: Especially if you don't like the camera it's very easy to do.

Kendra Perry: You don't have to do it like we do.

Christine: No, you can literally take your iPhone, if you have Anchor, it's an app and you can literally just hit the record button like you do on a voice memo and it really uploads it straight onto your podcasts clouds, and yet it's available on Spotify and iTunes, and you literally just take your iPhone and you speak into it whatever's in your head. It's super-easy nowadays, yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Got you. I'll have to ask you some stuff off here about that.

Christine: Yeah. All right. What else did we forget? We're super-organized, as you can see.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, in terms of people looking. Now, functional medicine's a buzzword, and it's funny you mentioned doctors of physical therapy, people don't traditionally take them as doing functional medicine, but when I went into my doctorate program it was actually harder to get into than the MD program.

Christine: Really?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, yeah. It had become very popular, but the same thing happened that happened with attorneys. They opened up a lot of new schools at once and then that diluted the pool, and so that drove salaries down. But I think having a brick and mortar if you want to incorporate functional medicine into it, hire someone to help you with the low hanging fruit, things that you can do immediately, and hire someone ... There are hormone clinics popping up all over the place and you can just do hormones. I mean, you can, but if the gut's messed up or you're extremely toxic they're not good enough to work.

Dr. Tim Jackson: That's how functional medicine kind of gets a bad name, I think, people they just see dollar signs because they know if they name their clinic so-and-so Hormone Clinic, then people are going to come. But if I were to have a brick and mortar and call it ... I would probably call it something Hormone Clinic, but then I would drop all the other stuff on it.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, no it's a good point. I mean, hormones are just so trendy these days, and I mean all the women who I work with are like, "Oh, what about my hormones? What about my hormones?" I'm like, "We've been working on your hormones for a year, just not-"

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right.

Christine: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: "We've been working on your gut, your minerals, we've been detoxing metals, we're working on your hormones we're just not giving you hormones and [crosstalk 00:43:26] them specifically, but people don't like that.

Christine: Yeah.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Right, but that would require thinking. I read a stat the other day or a few weeks ago, the average IQ is dropping seen points every four to five years.

Kendra Perry: What? Is that a lot? That seems like a lot.

Dr. Tim Jackson: That is a lot.

Christine: That's a huge point.

Dr. Tim Jackson: So in nine to 10 years that's going to be 14 points, that's a lot.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, well I think my IQ is going up seven points every year. I think I'm good.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I think my sexiness factor's going up exponentially.

Christine: [crosstalk 00:44:02].

Kendra Perry: Oh, that's so interesting. And you think that's due just to all the crazy, sick unhealthiness going on these days?

Dr. Tim Jackson: Yeah, I mean I think a lot of it is low thyroid and a lot of it is mitochondrial dysfunction, because the nervous system has the highest concentration of mitochondria, so the first system that goes offline when you have mitochondrial dysfunction is the brain.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. yeah, true. I mean, so many of my clients, yeah, they have brain fog or they just have no memory, no recollection. They just forget everything, they have brain fog, they have mental health issues, it's so common, more common than any other symptom I feel like is brain shit.

Dr. Tim Jackson: That's because you live where it snows year-round.

Kendra Perry: I do. But I love the snow. I love. I love the ... Snow sucks I you don't do anything cool in it. If you just sit around and bitch about winter and you're like, "Oh, winter sucks," then yeah, snow sucks. But if you get out you can do so many cool things in the snow it's insane. You can ski, you can snowboard, you can go sledding, there's so much fun things. Once you get into it, once you find a snow sport, you're in love.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I love snowboarding, but if you go snowboarding anywhere around here it's like falling on cement.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, well you've got to come to British Columbia and ski some real BC powder, that is a game changer, that is orgasmic, my friend.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Well, then I'll have to look that up.

Christine: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, it's messed up.

Christine: Now you know my michochondria going-

Kendra Perry: Michochondria, good one.

Christine: Oh God, mitochondria, I cannot ... my brain. I think I have just dropped 12%.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Did you just combine German and English and another language?

Christine: It's my brain fog. I had a rough week and people.

Kendra Perry: All right, well, do we have anything else to cover today? We've covered a lot of random topics, which is fun. I like these episodes where we go where things take us, right?

Christine: Exactly, and I think there was super-helpful things there, and I just got a ton of ideas what we can add to our website.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Don't stress me out, my heart rate's going up.

Kendra Perry: Just can't handle the check.

Dr. Tim Jackson: I can't, I can't.

Christine: Oh good, we're such geeky people, I love it.

Kendra Perry: I know, I love the [crosstalk 00:46:23]-

Christine: All right, I think this has been awesome. People out there from our random train of thought episode, which still has been amazing, let us know what was the most interesting, random, surprising, whatever thing. Let us know why you are writing your five star iTunes review, and we will love you forever.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and before you shut down this podcast just take a screenshot, share it to your Instagram stories, tag 360HealthBizPodcast, and we will share it to ours, because we love IG stories. If you love them, then lets do it together.

Christine: Mention us. That's just a little tidbit, like you need to use the mention kind of icon, not just the app symbol but he actual mention because then we can do it. Otherwise, it's more difficult.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, totally, so there you go. All right guys, well thanks so much.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Whatever they just said.

Kendra Perry: He's like, "I don't know, what's Instagram story?"

Dr. Tim Jackson: Heart rate, heart rate.

Kendra Perry: Oh my God.

Dr. Tim Jackson: With social media I have an idea.

Kendra Perry: We're going to have to talk off-air, Tim.

Christine: Yeah, I'm absolutely ... Kendra, I would agree. Tim, we need to talk.

Kendra Perry: Well, thanks so much guys and thank you, Tim, so much for being here with us. This was awesome. It was super-fun to hang out and talk about health and business and all that nerdy shit. We love you guys and, as always, we will be back in two weeks time with another fantastic episode. Bye guys.

Dr. Tim Jackson: Thanks for having me.

How to Start an Online Health and Wellness Business

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When starting any business, let alone an online health and wellness business, it can be difficult to know where to start. You may feel super self-conscious or feel like an imposter comparing yourself to everyone else out there.

You are not allow in feeling this way.

When I first started my health coaching business, I had no idea how to market myself or where to start. Though I made 6 figures within 3 years of starting my business, I could have easily shaved off at least a year had I known what I know now.

With these 5 tips, you will be on the fast track to success as an online health and wellness coach. If these tips still aren’t enough to get you where you want to be, remember that I would be happy to mentor you along the way 🙂

When it comes to starting an online health coaching business or any online wellness business, there are 5 keys things you should do.

If you are trying to talk to EVERYONE, you’re likely talking to NO ONE.

You absolutely, 100% need to determine who your ideal client is and target them. Determine what social media platforms they are on. What kind of content would they be most interested in. And what is the best way to mark to them so they will not only buy into your great personality, but your great skills and offerings as a health coach.

Finding a niche market is the first tip and with that under your belt, the rest will come much easier. But you’ll need to watch the video to find out what the remaining 4 tips are 🙂

TRANSCRIPT

Starting a health coaching business requires way more than simply getting your health coach certification and then posting your stuff on Facebook. It actually requires having a plan and knowing what works in terms of marketing, not last year, not in 2018, but right now in 2019. So, how do you actually start a health coaching business in 2019? If you guys want to get functional help training plus online business strategies for health coaches, make sure to subscribe to my channel, hit the bell so you get notified when I post a video every Thursday.

Creating an online health coaching business is really no easy [inaudible 00:00:36]. It is no way easy. And it's really easy to get overwhelmed by all the information that's out there because there is so much or it's easy to get imposter syndrome when you look at your colleagues who are showing up on every single platform on a regular basis.

By the end of this video, you will understand the five most important places to start, the five things that you need to [inaudible 00:00:59] into, start your health coaching business, and start being successful this year. So guys, when I started my health coaching business, I was beyond confused. There was so much going on. I tried a million different things and even though I actually hit six figures in my health coaching business pretty quickly in about three years, I actually think I could have shaved off a full year to year and a half if I knew then what I know now. And guys, when you're starting out, there's so much happening in online business, there's so much changing. You actually 1000% need a mentor to help you cut through that online noise and help you fast track your health business. And I hope, I really hope that you will choose me as that mentor.

Okay, so step number one, the first thing you need to do, stop doing everything that you are doing right now and do this first. You need to determine who your niche is or who your ideal customer or ideal client is. This is super, super important. Once you figure this out, all the other steps, everything else you're trying to do is going to be so much easier. When it comes to online marketing, you cannot be general. You need to be absolutely super, super specific with who you help, that type of person and what problem you actually solve for them.

I've talked about this before in some of my videos and we're probably going to have to go a little bit deeper on this in a future video, but this is really important. If you can't grab the attention of a potential customer within about five seconds of them landing on your website or your social media channels, you're going to lose them. You have to be super specific. And I cannot stress this enough. So don't be out there saying, I help everyone or let me help you take your health to the next level, come to me if you want to experience wellness coaching. Those things don't mean anything. When people see that, they're just like, I don't know what that is. You have to be ultra specific with who you help.

Maybe you help women in their thirties who are struggling with debilitating menstrual cramps every time they get their period. So if I'm a woman with debilitating menstrual cramps and I see that on your social media tagline or on your website, I'm going to be like, wow, this is someone I need to listen to. This is someone I need to pay attention to, I'm going to follow them, I'm going to like their page, or going to check out their website and actually see what kind of content is on there.

It's really, really important to be specific and you want to be ultra specific. So what gender are they? What age are they? What type of job do they have? How many kids do they have? Are they married, are they unmarried? What do they make for an income? What's their job? What kind of car do they drive? What's their main problem? What do they want to achieve? What problem are they hoping to solve? All these things are super, super important. So you need to get ultra specific. You cannot be general online because if you try to talk to everyone, you're talking to no one. And I know this is scary, I get it. I know it's scary. You feel like you're going to turn people away, but you are not. This is actually helping you connect. In the end, you may actually work with all different types of people. But when it comes to marketing, when it comes to building an online business, you need to do this. You need to niche down and get ultra, ultra specific with who you help and what the problem is that you actually solve.

Step number two is to set up a website, but just set up a super, super simple, inexpensive website. Do not, I repeat, do not go out there and spend like $4,000 to $5,000 on some custom website. What matters is that your website is simple, it's to the point and it's responsive. What do I mean when I say responsive? I mean that it needs to look good on mobile and tablets. Most people these days are accessing the Internet through their smartphones. So you really need to make sure that your website looks just as good as it does on desktop as it does on the phone.

There's nothing worse than going to a website and you have to downsize everything because it's not mobile compatible and then you can't see anything, and it's just not easy to use. People have no patience online these days. So if that happens, they're going to bounce off your website like gangbusters. So when it comes to building a website, make it clean, make it simple, make it to the point. But also, coming back to your ideal client and your niche, make it very specific about who you help. On that front home page, on that first fold, you should tell people who you help. So, I'm so and so and I help women in their thirties suffering with debilitating menstrual cramps get relief without drugs. That would be perfect. If I fall into that category of person, I would be so excited to fall on your website.

Even though your website is your website, make it about them, you need to make it about them. People don't care about you. And I'm not saying this to try to be an asshole, but people don't care about you. They care about them. They care about themselves and they care about how you can help them, what's in it for them. So make your whole website directed at them and how you are actually solving the problem that they came to you for. You can go with Squarespace, you can go with Wix. There's a lot of really simple drag and drop websites out there, and just keep it simple. Once you start generating money and once you start getting a bunch of clients and you start really understanding who your target ideal audience is, then you can eventually upgrade to a custom website in the beginning. Don't spend more than $300 on a website.

Okay, step number three is content creation. Now you know who your target client is, you know the problem that you solve for them, you've got your super simple basic website up that tells them how you can help them. Now you need to start creating free content because online, the most important thing is that we build trust. We have to show people, we have to prove to them that we're worth following because people aren't going to work with us before they've gotten a piece of our methods and what we offer.

My advice is to create one piece of high quality content every single week. Whether that's a blog post, a podcast episode, a Facebook live, a YouTube video, whatever it is, create one really awesome banger piece of content every single week and then repurpose it. So take that video and transcribe it, turn it into a blog post, turn it into social media post. You can do a lot of different things with one piece of content. Don't try and reinvent the wheel. Don't try to create multiple pieces of content and get content overwhelm. Literally, I'm just telling you to create one valuable piece of content every single week.

Guys, and let me know in the comments. I would love to know, what is the one piece of content that you create every week or you're planning to create every week? Let me know in the comments.

Number four is to choose just one social media platform and learn it and study it. Do not try to be everywhere at once. It's really tempting to try to be on LinkedIn, on Facebook, on Instagram, on Twitter and on all these places. Especially because you're probably seeing some of your main competitors or colleagues out there being in a bunch of different places. But let me tell you, if someone is on multiple social media platforms, it means that they have a team behind them because it's a lot of work.

So as a solopreneur, as someone who's new to this and just starting out, just focus on one social media platform, whatever that is. Try to think of where your ideal client would actually be hanging out and then master that social media platform. Figure out what type of content is going to be best for that platform, what types of strategies work well, just choose one. Don't get overwhelmed. Don't compare yourself to others who are in multiple platforms. And provide value. Use that social media channel, whatever it is, to provide value to the people, to teach them, to educate, to position yourself as an expert and to just really, really show them that you are the expert in this field, in this topic and you are here to help them.

Don't be afraid to show your personality and provide value. Give away all your best tips. This is really going to help people trust you and connect with you. Guys, if you're feeling a bit overwhelmed on how you should actually show up on social media, make sure to watch my video, how to be authentic on social media without oversharing. You can find that on my YouTube channel. That will just help you show how you should actually be showing up on social media in 2019.

Step number five is to start growing your email list as soon as possible. The one big regret I have with my business is it took me quite awhile to actually start an email list and actually start nurturing that email list. But guys, when people say the money is in the list, this is no joke. Email marketing is not dead. It is still alive and well and it's the primary way that most people are actually selling to their audience. People really don't like being sold to on social media. They're really sensitive to it. And on top of that, social media platforms don't like when you try to sell on social media. They just chokehold your post and don't actually allow that many people to see it. So it's really, really important to have a strategy of getting people off your website, off your social media channels and onto your email list.

The best way to do that, guys, is to create a lead magnet, to create something to give away like a checklist or a cheat sheet or a quick guide, something that's really high value that helps them solve a quick win and it's easy to consume. We'll definitely be making a video on this in the future because this is a whole another topic in itself, but definitely 100% as soon as you start a business, you should start working on building your email list. Really, really important, guys.

Okay, so now that you hopefully, I hope, feel a little bit more enlightened on how to start building your health coaching business, make sure to grab my free insider's guide, The 10 Must Know Tips That Every New Health Coach Should Know. You should absolutely grab this, it's got a lot of juicy tips in it and it's basically everything I wish I knew when I was new and starting out. Guys, and if you like this video, please make sure to like it, leave me a comment, subscribe to my channel and do share it with your fellow health nerds, or your fellow health coaches. Help me get the word out there. I would appreciate that so much, and I'll see you in the next video.

How to Create an Effective Detox Program for Your Clients

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Tools mentioned in this episode:

ewg.org/skindeep EWG empowers people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. With breakthrough research and education, driving consumer choice and civic action

BioSil An advanced collagen generator. Clinically proven collagen generating supplement promotes healthier hair, skin and nails.

Oceans Alive is the ultimate superfood. A premium blend of two specially cultivated, hand-selected marine phytoplankton strains.

UNIKEY The best nutritional supplements for weight loss, detox, cleansing and anti-aging

Econugenics Pectasol-C The most advanced and effective Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) supplement available. 


- Grab our FREE Practitioner Tool Kit to get a list and review of all the platforms Kendra and Christine use personally in their businesses to save time, money and generate consistent income.


Transcript:

Christine:              Hello and welcome to this episode of the 360 HealthBiz Podcast here with the beautiful Kendra Perry,

Kendra:                  Hello.

Christine:              Who is going to blow your minds today, and myself, Christine Hansen. So we're super excited to be here with you today for this episode. But before we dive in, we have a little request that would make us so happy and that would feature you on our show. And that is if you hope over to iTunes right now and you leave us a five star review, we would be super, super, super grateful, and we would actually also read it on the podcast with your names. So have your little claim to fame, your couple of seconds of fame on our show, and that would be absolutely amazing, and we would know on the right track.

Kendra:                  Yay.

Christine:              So press pause and head over to iTunes right now. And as always, don't forget that Kendra and I will have an amazing Freebie for you on our website the 360healthbizpodcast.com where you have a huge box where it says that you can get a free tool kit, which is absolutely essential for anyone who's either starting out with a health coaching business, considering starting a coaching business, or someone who's in the middle of having a health coaching business, or someone who has been doing it for ages and still wants to see if there are some little nuggets that were just missed. And so we, we share all the tools that we're using and that has made our lives so much easier.

Kendra:                  Yeah. And I actually just beefed it up too. I threw in, an example of a really good client contract and a really good example of a claim intake form. So I just juiced it up a little bit.

Christine:              Amazing. But if you have it already, don't worry, you can just sign up again and you will get sent the link straight away.

Kendra:                  Exactly.

Christine:              Perfect. Alright, so we're going to dive straight into our content today. So we don't have a guest, but it's our, both of us today. And we're going to do continuous education episode, and we're going to talk about detox today. And personally it's been something that I had on the radar for a long time, but I never really saw the issue with, issues with it until I dove deeper and actually realized how inconsiderate a lot of programs and unfortunately even schools are with detoxing, right? So we consider it something super easy, something that you can do whenever, but actually it's something pretty serious that you're doing to your body. So Kendra is an absolute wizard with these topics. I'm going to let her take the lead, take notes people, because this is going to make your practice so much more efficient. You will be ahead of the curve because you will know things that your clients never heard before and nobody else has told them that it's going to make you a much better practitioner. So Kendra, take it away.

Kendra:                  Awesome. And I love talking about this topic because I think it's a really misused word. I think detoxification is a very important process that we should always be thinking about all of us, whether you're a practitioner, client, everyone needs to be thinking about it, but it's a really overused, like kind of butchered word and it almost kinda has lost, it's like street cred to some degree because everyone out there is telling you that this will make you detox, that will make you detox, but when you actually kind of break down the building blocks of what that program or product actually is, like a lot of these things, they actually don't improve detox and a lot of them actually prevent detox altogether. So it's kind of one of my missions to try to make people better understand this because in my personal opinion, if you're not detoxing on the regular, you're going to be sick,

Christine:              Yes.

Kendra:                  and not gonna have energy and you're going to have a hard time losing weight and you're gonna have brain fog and you're going to end up with chronic illness.

Christine:              Exactly. I think that is like the number one thing that my clients are very surprised about when they tell that they want to go to someone who wants to do a detox with them and I always ask them, 'are you sure is your body actually ready for this? And detoxing can be very dangerous. If you're already sick. It might not be the best idea to do full on detox.' And they look at me like super surprised. I find that is already showing that you have more knowledge than you know, a general, just like the average practitioner may be or someone who's just, you know, just dip, dabbling with supplements for funds.

Kendra:                  Yep.

Christine:              Right. Well let's go into detox and maybe, you know, when I play the devil's advocate, when I think about detox, what I used to think was that you take a product, you eat certain foods and then your body just eliminates all the crap that it has inside and once it's done, you clean and shiny and sparkly, and everything is just working like a new brand new Ferrari engine. Right. So correct me if I'm wrong. Which I'm sure I am.

Kendra:                  Yeah. And there's a few, there's some truth to what you said, but then there's some caveats as well. And yeah, we're going to go through what detoxification actually is today, why it's important, but I'm also going to tell you how you can design an effective safe detox for your clients, where it actually gives the client what you're telling them, it's that you're giving them. Because a lot of people are like, 'oh, sign up for my detox program,' but the program actually doesn't help you detox. And so it is true. Like our body's always detoxing, right? Like we have detoxification pathways and methods and organs and cells in the body. And if that process were to ever stop, you'd probably be dead within a couple days, right? Like you wouldn't live very long because, you know, we're always, you know, bringing this crap into her body. So like detox, it's not just like, 'oh, like I do this detox once a year and I'm good.' Like, it's like, 'no,'like your body actually is always detoxing. Your body is very good at it. But the sort of caveat is the fact that we live in a very different than we did 100 years ago, right. In the industrialized world, puts a lot of chemicals into the environment and right now there's upwards of 84,000 chemicals in the environment in North America. I don't know what it is for Europe, but it's probably similar because we share the same planet, right? There's winds and currents and that stuff gets kind of spread around the globe. So you know, there's all these chemicals now being added into our environment. Only a fraction of them are actually being tested for human safety. Very few of them are actually being tested for long-term. The approval process of getting a new chemical in the US is ridiculous. Like they just like push it through. It's a little different in Europe. You guys are a little bit more advanced North American.

Christine:              Yeah, it's like a proven until the innocent or proven until guilty kind of [inaudible]. In the US it's like anything is fair game until you prove that it's absolutely horrible. In Europe it's, you know, we're not letting it on the market until you prove that it's safe, right. So.

Kendra:                  Yeah. And I mean that's a much better perspective and I know like when it comes to ingredients in our personal care products, like Europe's were called thousands, whereas I think the US is, we're called maybe five or six or something.

Christine:              I know.

Kendra:                  So it's like, okay, that's a pretty big difference. But you know, a lot of the chemicals that, you know, we exist with that we live in, we live in a very chemical world and they've been connected to allergies, cancer, birth defects, you know, mental health issues, psychological disorders, like they're all around us and like we are getting exposed like, I don't care if you are living in Nepal, at the top of the Himalayas, like in a mud hut. Like, you still have some of these things in your body. And the research is pretty clear on that, Christine. Like there's studies of a human breast milk, and in human breast milk, I mean they find persistent organic pollutants, they find heavy metals, they find pesticides, all kinds of contaminants, in human breast milk, right? Like, how's it getting in there? Well, it's getting absorbed into the body through food, water, skin, air, that sort of thing. And then that is making people very sick and this is, like, a topic that I think we all need to pay really big attention to. Like I know in the functional medicine world, everyone is talking about the gut and that's great. Yes, digestive health is important. We had an episode about poop. We love poop, we love the gut, but it doesn't go deep enough for me. And I think, you know, everyone saying, well the gut is the root of all illness. I think that's really misled, because I honestly believe it's chemicals, metals, toxins. It's our toxic environment because, you know, we see in our practices. Like me and Christine do a lot of gut testing and what we see is chronic infections that we have a really hard time clearing, even though they eat really well and they live a healthy lifestyle. They get all these infections. So the big question is like, well why is the gut so unhealthy? Especially when people are actually leading a pretty healthy lifestyle. Right? And I think that's where we start to dig into all these underlying toxins and chemicals that are making their way into our bodies.

Christine:              Yeah. And I think the main organ or one of the biggest organs that we have, that we tend to neglect as our skin. Right?

Kendra:                  Yes.

Christine:              So I tell people if you're chronically ill, if there's lots of things going wrong, just thinking about what you put on your skin. If you wouldn't put it into your mouth then don't put it on your skin because it's getting absorbed just as much, right.

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              And that is something that make a big shift in a lot of people, who in the beginning of hesitant, you know, who are like, 'oh yeah, well there's no parabens in there anymore, or maybe no sulphates and no soda cans,' but, you know, that's not it, that's not enough.

Kendra:                  Yeah. And there's other things in there too. A lot of products that tout themselves as natural health products, like when you actually look at the ingredients, you can find all kinds of stuff. And a really great resource is actually the environmental working group, ewg.org/skindeep. I think. You can actually input your personal care product into their database and it'll come up with all the ingredients and like what studies have linked them to. So you can actually get a safety rating for everything you're using or if you don't have time for that, you're like, I'm too fucking busy. I don't have time for that. Just look at their top rated lists. They have like a top 10 list for a lot of different products.

Christine:              [inaudible]

Kendra:                  And so that's a really good place to start. And I mean I think obviously with detox, like people will, you know, spend 10 days a year during their little cleanse or their little detox, and think that they're good, but you know, if you're not doing anything to address the incoming source then detoxification doesn't work. Right? It's like you've got this, like, sink with a tap that won't stop running and you clear the drain temporarily, but if you don't actually address the leak, I mean that sinks just going to keep overflowing and filling up. So I think detox always needs to start with looking at our environment and really kind of, I guess looking at our relationship with chemicals, right? Like what, how are we letting chemicals into our lives? You know, are we drinking tap water? Tap water's a really huge source of toxicity. Christine's like, 'Oh my God, it's so toxic.' Yeah. Tap Water, even [inaudible] water.

Christine:              You really notice the difference. I never thought, you know, everyone is always in Luxembourg your tap water is fine, and I'm like, you know, it's maybe not even the water, but it's like just the pipes.

Kendra:                  Oh yeah.

Christine:              You live in Europe, it's super old. The pipes in the village I used to live, were was super, super old and I realized that after I switched to tap, to mineral water, from Luxembourg though, because I don't [inaudible] like have reactions, right.

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              It was so heavy it, so it really showed me that it's not [inaudible]. So I'm just a huge snob when it comes to water.

Kendra:                  Yeah. You should be a snob when it comes to water honestly, because it's the main way that people make themselves toxic and a lot of places will tell you like, 'oh, we have really, we have the cleanest drinking water.' But like, yeah, it's because it doesn't have like faecal contamination in it. It doesn't have maybe parasites or bacteria. But, they're not filtering for metals, pesticides, you know, they're not filtering. It's going to have chlorine in it. It's probably gonna have fluoride. And the biggest thing with municipal water is actually a drug residues, right? Everyone's taking drugs, people taking birth control or hormone replacement, diabetes medication, whatever. They pee it back out into the water and that goes back into your drinking system. So that's a really big one that people need to be considering as well. Yeah. So let's talk. I want to talk a little bit about like what actually is detoxification, and like what parts of the body...

Christine:              Yeah [inaudible]

Kendra:                  Actually.

Christine:              [inaudible]

Kendra:                  Totally. I think we have a bit of a delay, Christine, you're kind of cutting in and out for me.

Christine:              Yeah. But it's fine. I'm just [inaudible]. It's okay, I'm listening.

Kendra:                  Okay, cool. Yeah. So what is, you know, detoxification. It's kind of a sexy word, but what it actually is, what it actually should be called is conjugation, which isn't very sexy, but it's just basically the process of transforming one thing into another. Goes through several phases of detoxification and it comes out as something that our body can actually process and run through the colon, the sweat, the kidneys. Something that's safe, because you can't actually put a toxin into the body and just move it out as is, the body can't do that. It has to be transformed. And so there's actually four phases of detoxification. And I know Christine, that the liver gets all of the kind of fame for detoxification, but the liver actually detoxifies a lot less than the skin, and then the cells in the stomach. So the enterocytes in the stomach actually detoxify way more than the liver. So does the kidneys, so does all kinds of cells all over the body. So it's not just the liver. We shouldn't just be thinking about our liver. We actually need to be thinking about cellular detox. And basically the easiest way to break it down, and I should have a whiteboard behind me because it'd be really easy to describe, but basically there is phase zero and that's when the toxin goes into the cell. Once the toxin is in the cell there is phase one and phase two. And that's what most people are familiar with,

Christine:              Yeah.

Kendra:                  there familiar with the phase one and the phase two. Phase one takes a fat soluble toxin, changes it into a peroxide, and then phase two takes that peroxide and turns it into a water soluble compound. And then phase three is when that, that talks and leaves that cell and then gets excreted. So there's actually four phases. Phase one and phase two or phase three, were all, were recently discovered, but there are those four phases. And we actually need to be supporting all of those phases when you do a detox. And what's really interesting is there are very famous, I'll call them famous, like detox ingredients that people will pump you full of during a detox. And they're virtually in every single detox product. I do my air quotes, but they actually, they actually blocked detoxification and...

Christine:              What the fuck, right?

Kendra:                  Yeah. And to have these are milk thistle and curcumin.

Christine:              Oh! [inaudible]

Kendra:                  I thought you'd have that reaction.

Christine:              I'm like, hang on, in every program I've ever read it's like Qq is like, yeah, that's the thing you need to everyday put it into smoothies, put it everywhere, brush your teeth with it.

Kendra:                  Yeah. So, I mean, I'm not saying those are bad ingredients, but for the purposes of a detox, like if you actually want to help someone detoxify, milk thistle actually blocks the, the third phase of, of detoxification, so does curcumin. So those actually prevents those toxins from leaving the cell. Okay. Milk thistle is very helpful for the liver. Yes. It helps rebuild the liver. It's very good for that. But for the purposes of detox, like it's not something you should be taking long term. It's not something you should put into a detox product. So you're probably going to go into your shelf and look at all your detox supplements and you're gonna to have to throw them all out.

Christine:              Throw them all out.

Kendra:                  Yeah. Because they're going to have that. And so I, you know, I think that's a really important thing to consider because there's lots of products on the market that tell you they are detox products and they're not, and this comes down to the fact that like when you're detoxifying, you actually need to have three things present. You need to have something that's going to immobilize, something that's going to like stir up the toxins because the toxins are getting stored pretty deeply in our body, right? They're getting stored in fat cells, brain cells, organs, tissues, like they get, they get put in there, and especially fat cells, Christine. Like fat cells are kind of like this nice little like membrane thing and

Christine:              Yeah.

Kendra:                  the body can push a toxin into there and it'll protect it from the rest of the body, right? It'll protect that toxin from the rest of the body. So the body doesn't really want to immobilize that toxin. So it's, you have to do something that's going to immobilize.

Christine:              That's also, I think why, you know, when women want to get pregnant, I always tell them that now is not a good time because, you know, if you get rid of of that basic unleashes that toxic [inaudible], that's the first step, right. It's not, you have a regular load, plus your actually going to unleash and what’s been stored up. And especially also I know that women with endometriosis, that tissue's very absorbent as well, so not just for hormones but also for toxins, so, which is why there are so many inflammation issues, you know,

Kendra:                  Yes.

Christine:              So, it's, I'm just saying if you're a women or you're dealing with people who have fertility issues, be very mindful of that, right. And for anyone how has a health condition or who you know is going to go through a hard time or anything like that. Just as a word of warning. Do not start a detox. When you know that there's something happening very soon like that. So it's a big process. It's a big deal, right.

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              You don't know how much is in there, how much is stored in there, you don't know what it is. You don't know how the body's going to react to it. And so just a little disclaimer, free warning.

Kendra:                  No, I think that's a really good point. Pregnancy, nursing, these aren't times where you detox and yeah, when I work with clients it's like if we're on, if we have them on like a gut protocol, where they're getting rid of infections and maybe we're doing some detox that we have to kind of give that all a stop. We have to hold that until after they're done breastfeeding, because you're right, it's not a time to be detoxing. You don't want toxins to go into the placenta and into your baby. Right? So, yeah, that's a really good point. But I love how, what you said about endometriosis. Because that's a big one for toxins. Especially because a lot of the plastics in our environment, they mimic human estrogen and that's a really big issue with a lot of these toxins or xenobiotics is that they look very similar and they act very similar to human estrogen and hormonal issues I think are very much driven by this chemical toxicity. And you know, I think males are having the same issues. Like you know, too much estrogen in a male is going to lead to like man boobs and weight issues, right?

Christine:              And sleep issues.

Kendra:                  Yes, and sleep issues. Sleep like a boss.

Christine:              Yeah. And I can see that at a lot when I run into something like the Dutch test and I can see everything pointing towards something and then I have a woman with endometriosis, you know that the results might be skewed because those little fuckers are just holding on to their dear life in [inaudible]. So it's just good to know that.

Kendra:                  Yeah. Yeah. And definitely like, like you mentioned with endometriosis, like those tissues are very absorbent and they're absorbing a lot of chemicals and toxins. And then when that gets shed every month, I think that really pays into that inflammation and that extreme pain that women feel has endometriosis. A lot of detox needs to happen with endometriosis for sure.

Christine:              Agreed.

Kendra:                  Yeah. And so we've talked about, so the three things that you need, we've talked about immobilization you need to, and I'm going to give you guys some examples of these. So this will help you design your own detox program. There's, you want to immobilize, you want to kind of move those toxins out of the cells, out of the tissues. Number two is the actual like detoxification or transformation, conjugation, conjugation part, so that's something that you're gonna give them to help them move toxins into the body, to boost those different phases of detoxification. It's not going to be curcumin, it's not going to be milk thistle, it's not going to be black pepper, because all those things will block your phases of detoxification, but actually what I'm going to tell you in a second, is going to surprise you because these ingredients are these supplements that I'm going to tell you about, you've actually probably never even seen in a detox product, which is kind of funny to me, because they were actually the best way to enhance detoxification. So that's number two. And then number three is excretion, right? So we need to immobilize, we need to move things through the phases of detoxification, but then we have to help with the excretion and actually getting that out. And this is what most detox programs are missing. They don't do anything to help with excretion. They might stir it up, they might try to open the phases of detox, but they don't actually help you move it out of the body, which means that those toxins are probably going to get redeposited.

Christine:              Exactly.

Kendra:                  Yeah, exactly. So that sucks. We don't want that, and that's how detox can make people sick, right. Can make people feel like crap because they're just stirring up toxins and not really moving them out. So let's talk about some of the things that actually help them immobilize toxins. So this will probably surprise you, but one of the best ways to do it is actually fasting and calorie restriction, because that causes the fat cells to burst, right? We want the fat cells to burst and dumped their toxins. So intermittent fasting or extended fasting or calorie restriction are actually really great ways to do this. And this is why I think detox needs to be part of weight loss programs because with calorie restriction, ultimately you are immobilizing toxins. And I actually think maybe the reason why people gain back their weight is because they dump a lot of toxins, but then they don't get moved out. So the body needs to store them again,

Christine:              Yeah.

Kendra:                  body makes more fat cells or bigger fat cells.

Christine:              Makes sense.

Kendra:                  Yeah. Yeah. So that's a good way to do it. I mean, that can be obviously a bit intense for people, but it's the best way to do it. Something else that will mimic the same effects of fasting calorie restriction is actually vitamin B3 or Niacin in higher doses. I don't know if you've ever used that, Christine, but you have to be careful with it because it'll make you flush. Like if you take it...

Christine:              Yeah.

Kendra:                  in high doses, like it makes you go super red, like a tomato, you get super. [inaudible]

Christine:              [inaudible] I had it yesterday, yesterday.

Kendra:                  Oh really?

Christine:              No kinding. I went to see a friend of mine is doing Chinese medicine and she wanted to show you a new thing and she gave me this multivitamin and she was like, 'I put a little bit of B3 in there,' [inaudible] tomato, I hope it wasn't too much, but I didn't. So it was good. But it made me pee like [inaudible]

Kendra:                  Oh yeah, totally. Yeah. It has a really interesting effect on the body. And so you want to take it, like if you're going to take it, you want to start with a really low dose,

Christine:              Yeah.

Kendra:                  like possibly like 50 milligrams or less, because if you go buy like a 500 milligram capsule like you're gonna you might, well you might puke because it's acid, so it will burn your stomach and it'll make you feel very nauseous and then you'll be super red. You'll be read like a beat, you'll be itchy. I mean, you're just going to be like, 'Oh my God, what is happening?'

Christine:              Yeah.

Kendra:                  But what it does and there's actually a whole Niacin detox program that's very interesting. But you want to start with a small dose and kind of work your way up. So you could do like a two week or three week detox with Niacin where you start at 50 milligrams and you the way up as high as a thousand or even two. But there's actually this, and I want to mention this because I, this is just so so cool to me. So after 9/11, Christine, a lot of those firefighters were very sick because they got exposed to all those toxic building materials when they were going through the rubble of those buildings and a lot of them were demonstrating Parkinson like symptoms, neurological symptoms, like they were very sick and they actually were put through this Niacin detox which was developed actually by L. Ron Hubbard, the creator of scientology, which is random.

Christine:              Your kidding.

Kendra:                  But, yeah, totally. He developed this way before he developed scientology, but actually is a way to detox people getting off of drugs. And so they went through this program, these firefighters, and basically it involves taking this high dose Niacin, some exercise, and then getting in a sauna and sweating it out. And they were sweating out purple. There's, you can go on Google and look up like 9/11 firefighter Niacin detox, and you'll see pictures of guys holding up towels that are drenched in purple from all the toxins.

Christine:              Oh my God.

Kendra:                  The crazy things that they were bringing through their skin.

Christine:              Mind blown people. I'm telling you, this is good stuff

Kendra:                  Yeah. I know it's, it's totally mind blowing. And it's really crazy. So I think it's a very effective, it's been around for a long time, but you know, obviously if you are doing the Niacin detox like it is best that you, you know, speak with a professional who knows what they're doing first, you should always consult Dr, Professional, that sort of thing. And, you need to be implementing the other phases as well.

Christine:              Exactly [inaudible]

Kendra:                  The other thing I wanted to mention, that'll do it, that'll help them better for. Sorry, go ahead Christine.

Christine:              Yeah, I was just going to say that be cautious about these things, don't forget when we told you, right.

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              Run phase one and phase two and phase three. This is just like the facilitator. You need, it's like having a plane landing, right? And then having the passengers are all the different toxins coming out and then you need a bus to shuttle them out, right. So right now where just helping passengers to get out of that plane, which is just like your fat cells and everything, and now you need to shuttle them off. Right? So...

Kendra:                  I love that analogy. I think that's great, like people will be like, 'Yeah, that totally makes sense.' And there is one other thing, and this won't do all toxins, but this is one I use, it's called BioSil. I'll just put that up to the camera for those of you who are watching us on video, but basically it's marketed for skin, hail, hair and nails, but it's just silicone, and silicone actually helped stirrup metal. So this might not get your, your chemicals, your xenobiotics, I'm not super familiar with it, does that, but it does stir up certain metals. So this is actually a really great part of a metals detox program is a little bit of silicon. And a lot of people are already taking it for skin, hair, teeth. But you can take up to 10 drops a day. It can cause a lot of fatigue if you have a lot of metals, you want to start with one drop, but again, if you're going to take it, you, you need to be doing the other things as well. So that's, that's what you need to do with immobilizing toxins. So if you design a detox program, it should either contain some sort of intermittent fasting, some sort of calorie restriction, or Niacin and be careful with the Niacin, because if you give someone a Niacin flush, like we mentioned, it's pretty unpleasant and it might make someone never want to work with you again. So, yeah.

Christine:              Yes. They might think they have an allergic reaction and might die. So it's, yeah, no, no. Every time I, I've been weary of it, you know, when they told me, it's been the third time was something that I have it, I have never had anything happen, but I was like, 'I don't want to flush.'

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              [inaudible] just want to know about it but you know, I mean stuff with a super low dose and just do plan, stick to it and hydrate.

Kendra:                  Yep, hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.

Christine:              [inaudible] if you have a reaction [inaudible].

Kendra:                  Yeah, yep, yeah, exactly. And it's temporary, like if you do have a reaction. I've had it. I've, I've overdone Niacin multiple times because I'm, I'm just like don't follow my own follow my...

Christine:              Come on!

Kendra:                  I'm like terrible at following my own advice. But it is temporary and it will, it will pass. It may make you feel very sleepy. Like when I've overdone it, I've literally had people pass out because it makes me very tired. It also sometimes will make you like really goosebumpy, like it makes me really cold and sleepy and I feel like getting the covers and pass out. But yeah, just, actually take my advice, don't be like me, I, I'm horrible for following my own advice sometimes I'm just like, 'oh, I'll just, I'll just see what happens. I'll just, oh whatever. I'll just, I'll just try it.'

Christine:              Maybe that was why I was so tired yesterday morning.

Kendra:                  Yeah, it can make you sleepy, for sure. So take it before bed.

Christine:              [inaudible]

Kendra:                  Okay. So that's the immobilization. And then we have to talk about the actual detoxification part. So that's where we're taking things to actually help boost detoxification. So milk thistle, curcumin, black pepper. Those things inhibit certain phases of detoxification. You don't want to take those. But things that have actually been proven scientifically, to help with detoxification is coQ10St John's Wort, and then two strains of lactobacillus, the probiotic, the rhamnosus, and the plantarum. So that's funny, hey Christine, like, have you ever heard those into detox product before?

Christine:              No. Like I, I'm the biggest lactobacillus rhamnosus, [inaudible] anyway. Gg strain is the one that I love, like, you need to know probiotics have different strains. The Gg is one that I love because it's like this old style kind of thing, I haven't, but it makes total sense. It makes complete sense to me. The plantarum I haven't seen before, no. Do you know, by any chance, if there are any strains that are better than others?

Kendra:                  Yeah. I just know the rhamnosus and the plantarum, so I know those strains. I know there's like different strains of each, but as far as I know, it's just those...

Christine:              The main.

Kendra:                  Those main ones that will help. And yeah, the coQ10 and say, like coQ10 is typically something used with people with like, like MS and Parkinson's and St John's Wort is typically used for depression, anxiety, like mental health issues. But they actually are really great detoxifier. So it's just funny because, you know, I look at, and someone's gonna hate me for this, but like those, those shakology things, right.

Christine:              Yeah.

Kendra:                  It's like, 'Oh, this helps you detox.' And I look at the ingredients and it's got a ton of things in there that actually block detoxification. And then it's just full of shitty low quality vitamins and minerals that aren't even very well absorbed and some like fillers, and I'm just like, this is a really expensive product, it doesn't help you detox. It's like, I'm sorry, but it's shit.

Christine:              It's shit. Yeah. It's not doing anything. It's just random product in there that used to be, I think a lot of these products where developed in the 90's, early 2000's, and nobody's really revised them since then, right?

Kendra:                  Totally.

Christine:              And then you have some products, you know, who have everything.

Kendra:                  Yep.

Christine:              There you have milk thistle and Q10 and it's like, well that's not going to help either. Right? It's really tricky. So the best is to take things in there, you know, proper form not, I think it's super hard to find a really good all in one product.

Kendra:                  Yep.

Christine:              I prefer taking things separately, tying them in properly, and having each individual product do their stuff. It's just more bespoke. It's more tailored, it's more efficient.

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              I just prefer that.

Kendra:                  Yeah, I agree. Like the thing about like minerals for example, is there a very heavy. Right? Very like physically heavy. Like they have all those electrons, like if you get nerdy and look at the periodic table, they just get heavier as you go down. Let's get nerdy and, the thing is if you're taking a multivitamin, like, like if it has everything in it, like you're taking it at such a low dose, that, that's why a lot of multivitamins or synthetic, because they're so weak when they're natural that they have to be synthetic. And I mean I don't think synthetic vitamins and minerals are helpful. And then if you're going to take a national multivitamin, like you would have to take like 10 to 20 times the normal dose to be able to for it to have any effect. Like when people ask me about multivitamins again, they're wondering about an all in one product that can be helpful. My favorite thing is actually marine phytoplankton. There's a company that gets an activation products but it's called Oceans AliveMarine Phytoplankton. And it actually contains every single mineral and vitamin that the human body needs. Tastes like swampy seawater. But it's really good stuff. And it's in like a very safe, natural plant based form and the really cool thing about the marine phytoplankton is it's alive and if it had too many toxins in it, like if it was contaminated it would die.

Christine:              Yeah.

Kendra:                  So that's how they can tell that it's good quality and it's not contaminated. So that's. And that will actually help you detox as well. That's a good like kind of base detox product because it has all the vitamins you need.

Christine:              There you go.

Kendra:                  Yeah. So that can be helpful. But the other things that work really well, and Dandelion is actually a little bit more well known. I think Dandelion is well known.

Christine:              Yes.

Kendra:                  For its detoxification benefits and it does. So dandelion, Chicory root tea is really helpful. And then anything that boosts bile. So bile is something that your liver makes but it stored in the gallbladder and your body will secrete it every time you consume fat. Right? It's kind of like the dish detergent, like if you have an oily pan and you're trying to wash it with water, like you don't get anywhere, you need that soap to kind of emulsify it and break it down, that's what bile is. And bile is actually one of the most detoxifying things that your body has. So bitters are really great.

Christine:              Yeah.

Kendra:                  All your bitter foods, greens, that sort of thing. That can be really helpful as well. So you want to be.

Christine:              [inaudible]

Kendra:                  What were you going to say Christina?

Christine:              [inaudible] Is that some of my clients have gallbladder [inaudible] and as a result they were [inaudible], and to me, that's just so irresponsible. Like there's reason for all of this happening. You cannot just cut out an organ, right. So if you do not have a gallbladder, obviously you have to eat differently. You cannot eat as much in one go, just simply because, you know, the gallbladder is that to help the body out once its natural flow has, you know, emptied.

Kendra:                  Yes.

Christine:              But what I do find is that you can help it with, I even had really great success with essential oils, actually. Essential oils that were great with plants, that help digestions and things like that. That could definitely help even topically. But that's just a little side note for those of you maybe don't have a gallbladder anymore or just like don't let it [inaudible].

Kendra:                  Yeah. And so if you don't have a gallbladder, like if you do have a gallbladder, I mean you could be doing things all day long to help stimulate bile and that's really helpful, but you don't want to be doing that when you don't have a gallbladder because then you're just dumping bile into the intestine because you have no storage place for it and then it can be a bit aggravating. So you just want to, you know, only take your bile stimulants when you are eating. Bitters are helpful. Actually, there's a product from UNIKEY called Bile Builder, that I really like. It's got everything that helps build bile and then you might add in some bile salts as well. Just to help because yeah, like gallbladders are really important. Obviously there are medical emergencies where it needs to happen. But typically if I'm working with someone and they're like, 'oh, like my doctor wants to take out my gallbladder.' I'm like, 'give me six months.'

Christine:              Yes.

Kendra:                  Like just, you know, give me six months. Like, I think we can. And typically they won't need to get it removed. It's just because their bile has become thick, luggy and toxic, and we need to kind of thin it out and move it through the gallbladder and make it like viscous again, like that word, viscous.

Christine:              [inaudible]

Kendra:                  Okay. So the last thing that we have to consider when we're making or building a detoxification program is that excretion part. And so we always want to be taking a binder, something that will help bind to toxins and move it out so that they're not getting recirculated. Typically fiber will do that. The most commonly known binders are things like charcoal, bentonite clay, psyllium husk or, chitosan, which is a shellfish fiber. So if you're allergic to fish, that's not an option. But the thing about those binders that is unfortunate is they, they do bind to all the crap, but they also bind to minerals and pulled them out of the body. So they're not a great long term strategy. So what I use instead, my favorite binder of all time is modified citrus pectin. It's basically just the rind of citrus fruits, and it's great because if you, if it's modified properly, if the people who make it modify it properly, it will get all the crap, all the toxins, all the metals, all the chemicals, even glyphosate, but it does not fuck with the minerals. It doesn't pull them out at all. So the company that has proven that they do this properly is Econugenics. So that's the only company I recommend for modified citrus pectin, because they backed up their shit with a lot of research. A lot of companies will say they make modified citrus pectin but they actually don't modify it properly. And then you're pulling out minerals with toxins which you don't want to do.

Christine:              Amazing. So I had no idea. So I'm super like, 'WHHAAAT?'

Kendra:                  WHAAAT? So I've got some in my tea right now, I take it in my tea every single morning. It's a supplement. When people ask me, 'Hey, I'm on a budget, what's the one supplement I should take?' I always say the citrus pectin because it pulls out all that crap out of your body that we are getting exposed to. It's very safe. It helps boost glutathione. It helps stimulate the immune system. And so everyone should drink it every morning and thier tea.

Christine:              I'm going to get that straight away. Like, I'm going to order that today.

Kendra:                  Yeah. So it's Econugenics Pectasol-C. Get like the, the big thing will cost you like $100, which seems expensive, but at five grams a day it lasts you three months. So it's not too bad.

Christine:              That's totally fine. I mean it's like, it as I always say, this is just our vessel, right? We're just here because of this vessel that is our body. If we can help it to be less toxic. It's easy, you know, like.

Kendra:                  Yeah, totally. I totally agree. It's so important. Like, I mean I have, I have like a health budget, like I have like set aside money every month for what I assigned on my health because it's very, very important to me. It's a priority. I can't do my job. I can't be happy if I don't have my health. Right? So I think investing in our health is something we all need to be doing.

Christine:              Yes. Agreed. Much more so than software, you can live without one software.

Kendra:                  Arg, I love software though. Dammit.

Christine:              Me too, but like seriously, some of them are so expensive, their like $50 a month, were I'm like, 'Oh God.'

Kendra:                  Well everyone's on like a membership model now. Hey? It drives me crazy. I'm like, just give me a one-time fee.

Christine:              Yes. But you know, instead you can just buy the supplements instead, you know, and it's going to make you produce a lot more too, which is good.

Kendra:                   Yeah, exactly. It's really good stuff. A lot of people feel really good on it, so highly recommend it. And then the other thing you want to be thinking about is actually like, okay, so we're binding, but we want to be actually forcing that excretion. Sauna therapy is probably one of the best ways to do this. It's the most well researched. It's really easy to get swept things through the skin. Right. And a lot of us don't sweat that much, especially if you know, me and Christine live in like of the northern latitudes right now it's winter. We're not sweating that much. I just came from Costa Rica and literally all I did was sweat like a Mofo for three weeks [inaudible].

Christine:              I am a sweater. Like when it's hot, I sweat like a really great sweater, but there's many funny this, my nose, is like my main sweating organ, I kid you not.

Kendra:                  Really? Oh my God, that's so funny.

Christine:              Nothing in my face well start sweating but just my nose, and you can literary see the drops like forming. I don't know why.

Kendra:                  That's funny. I mean I'm definitely a face sweater. I'm like, it's funny because when we go ski touring or like hiking like, with like, you know, the girls, they have all their hair out, their hair is so nice and mine's just like shellacked to my head and I'm like, 'Oh God, why do you guy look so good. I'm just so disgusting right now.'

Christine:              Yeah. But I'm taking hot baths regularly. You know like, really hot baths that make me sweat. Like completely, like you know, oohh.

Kendra:                  Yeah, those actually work really well.

Christine:              Yeah, exactly. You have the steam, you have the heat, you sweat it in the water so you don't necessarily notice it. But it's like you notice it afterwards because your body is like parched.

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              And then obviously the mindful for what kind of body lotion, put on too, because it's going to absorb it.

Kendra:                  Yeah. Yeah, definitely. And I mean, that's a good point because, you can, if you don't own a sauna or you don't have access to a sauna, you can do baths, you can do a really hot bath which will help you sweat. But, you know, any sauna we'll do like, it doesn't need to be infrared. I know infrared Saunas are big hype these days, but it can just be like the sauna that's at your local fitness center or gym or whatever. I actually own an infrared sauna, I have one sitting right over there. I love it. Best investment of my life. It's great because you can actually be in it. You probably need one in your office. [inaudible]

Christine:              I need one. I am actually considering putting one into my office because I do have enough space. I just find it. It might look a little bit weird when clients come here and [inaudible].

Kendra:                  Yeah, I don't see clients here, but, just you know...

Christine:              [inaudible] but I do have this space. It's huge. It's like massive. My new office is massive.

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              I just saw a really good deal recently, on an Expo model infrared Saunas that I love. I was like, 'Ohhh.'

Kendra:                  It's definitely a game changer. I bought mine last year and things have really shifted for me since owning it, you know, like I use it on a regular basis, three to four times a week, you know, I get all the great benefits from the infrared, right. It's really good for skin. It has a lot of good anti-aging. It has weight loss benefits, but yeah, the sweating is what matters. And so, you know, obviously infrared, you can spend less, you don't have to stay in it as long or, and you can stay in it longer. Right? It heats you from the inside out, because I know when you go to like a wood fired sauna, like you breathe it into your lungs and it's hard to stay in. But The infrared, like it has that extra benefit of, of allowing you to stay in longer. But really in the end just get a sauna, like try to make that a regular part of your health regimen. You should be recommending it to your clients. The other thing you can do, that can be helpful. A lot of people are super freaked out by them, but are coffee enemas.

Christine:              Yeah, I have. My client last weekend and she was talking about a hydro colon therapy, which is a little bit like a coffee enema on steroids,

Kendra:                  Totally.

Christine:              Work with hot water, hot water and pressure and it's kind of painful really.

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              It is really painful. You have the impression that you get [inaudible]. But coffee enemas are super relaxed, like.

Kendra:                  Oh yeah.

Christine:              Get out of your head that your butt is a horrible place, right. It's actually much less worse than hydro colon therapy or colon therapy,

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              and you can just relax with it if you just let yourself go a little.

Kendra:                  And it's so true. And you know, it's so funny because I always tell my clients and my group members, I'm like, you know, just be open minded give it a go because most people are freaked out and then they fall in love. Like literally they fall in love with putting coffee up their butt.

Christine:              I know, it's like this warm and fuzzy feeling and then afterwards it feels like a new born, and it's easy and we'll get specific. Not specific, but there's a very good video of a lady doing it on YouTube. Like you don't see every detail, you do see her doing it basically.

Kendra:                  Yeah.

Christine:              And it just shows you how simply it is, right? And it's just like, it's just a hole people, you know, it's like.

Kendra:                  Yeah, I think people are weird about their butt.

Christine:              I know.

Kendra:                  But I mean personally I love pooping. I love to poop. It's just my favorite thing in the entire world. That's definitely tmi. But I'm into it. But yeah,

Christine:              You feel so much better afterwards.

Kendra:                  Oh yeah. And it's my time, you know, it's like I read a book, I do some meditation, like I make it sexy in there, like light some candles.

Christine:              Exactly. And there's a lady called Marissa something. I don't remember her name. I met her in August and she is the poop lady something and she said like the perfect poo is the length of your elbow to your wrist? And I was like, I cannot imagine that thing, but do you know why I couldn't?

Kendra:                  Why?

Christine:              European toilets are different than US toilets. Like if you have good poop in a US toilet, you would see the whole length, in European toilets it always breaks.

Kendra:                  Ohhh.

Christine:              You never see it in its full glory.

Kendra:                  Oh my God, that's so funny.

Christine:              So there you go people.

Kendra:                  Oh Man. That's such a, that is a great piece of information. I'm going to remember that with my European clients if you like, don't worry. You don't see the whole coil in the toilet because your toilets weird.

Christine:              There you go, Kendra is rocking your world with science and I know that toilets work differently when pooping.

Kendra:                  We each bring something very important to the table.

Christine:              [inaudible]

Kendra:                  Yep, totally.

Christine:              Tip of a tube that is much smaller.

Kendra:                  Yeah. It's very small and you know, the, the, what actually is happening with them. If this is your first time hearing about them and you're like, well, why would you put coffee up here? But it's because of the caffeine in the coffee. Once it's in the colon, it actually goes directly into the hepatic portal system, which is like the little capillary system that connects the colon to the liver and the gallbladder. And when the caffeine gets to the liver, gallbladder actually causes them to contract and run bile through and dump the bile. So it's a great way to help yourself like detox that bile. So it's a very mechanical way to detox the liver. And, you know, I know for natural cancer therapies, I mean they all have people doing these like three to six times a day just because that's how toxic people with cancer are. And so they're, you know, they're very safe to do. They tap it, typically make you feel good. Most people don't react to the caffeine the way you would if you drank a cup of coffee. Some people find them stimulating. I mean if you're going to try it for the first time, you should probably do it earlier in the day just to make sure. But I mean, I love them. I do them regularly. My boyfriend thinks I'm crazy. We joke around about butt coffee all the time.

Christine:              [inaudible] he's like, 'why don't you want to do anal if you do that?'

Kendra:                  Oh my God, I love that. [inaudible]

Christine:              [inaudible] Well we have to edit this out.

Kendra:                  Nah, we'll just leave it in.

Christine:              Like yeah, it's seriously. It's not, it's, put some music on. Like literally put some soft music on, get into the groove of just relaxing and just, it's literally something great for your body. Your body will love it.

Kendra:                  Yeah. Yeah, totally. Most people really like them after they've done them. So. So yeah. So that's what you need. So you know, if you want to create like, you know, we're coming into this episode is probably going to be released at being in January. Obviously January is a big time for the health industry for launching things because that's, you know, people spend December ruining their health and then in January they were ready for a new start. So this is a good time to create a detox program for your clients, right? So just make sure you're doing something to, immobilize toxins. You're doing something to boost that detoxification and then you're doing something to stimulate excretion and that's actually gonna get your clients results. That's actually going to make them feel good. And then the other thing I just wanted to mention is really think about things you can be doing on a daily basis to help yourself detox, because detox does need to be a daily thing. And you can, it doesn't need to be this big thing, you know, like I, will have a small cup of organic coffee first thing in the world because that helps stimulate bile. I have salty water first thing in the morning because it has minerals and minerals help you detox. Like, you know, I eat my bitter foods, I drink my dandelion tea, I get in the sauna, I do a coffee enema. Like there's things that you can be doing on a regular basis that we should be doing because we really do need to think about it daily because on a given day, who the fuck knows how much shit is getting into your body.

Christine:              Yeah, and you will feel so much better. You will be more alert, will have better energy, you will sleep better, your skin will look amazing. So it's the only benefits people. It's literally one benefits and you can do small things. You don't have to, you know, worrying about not having enough time to lay down on the floor and do a coffee enema. It's just an example that we gave you enough options that you can definitely do.

Kendra:                  Totally, yeah, just putting that modified citrus pectin into your tea every morning is a good detox strategy as well. And you know, with detox, I think the most important thing to keep in mind is the goal is not to do it quickly, fast detox is not safe. Because we accumulate so many toxins over our lifetime. Like we might be detoxing things that have been on our bodies since we were kids. Right? If you're a child of the 80's, like us, you ate a lot of butter or not butter, margarine and toxic like cheese and all kinds of weird shit, right. The 80's is like the worst time [inaudible] right?

Christine:              Yeah.

Kendra:                  What was considered healthy in the 80's is like pretty disgusting. So there's a good chance me and Christine have margarine sitting in our tissues.

Christine:              It's right here. I can tell you exactly where it is.

Kendra:                  Oh my God. Yeah. So, you know, slow, long term detox is key and wants to be gentle. I don't recommend quick detox and it's something that you should do more than once a year. I mean, you design a little, like 10 day detox, you know, do it several times a year. Launch it as a group program, right? Like, wouldn't that be a great group program to do a 30 day detox where you spend a couple of weeks like helping people like build up and kind of pre-prepare for it. Do 10 day detox that includes these three things we just talked about and then do some sort of final, you know, recovery, restoration thing, like that could be a really great 30 day group program that you could launch a couple of times a year. Right.

Christine:              And your testimonials will go through the roof.

Kendra:                  Yes. Yeah, yeah. I think. I think we really need to educate people on what detox actually is and how to actually do it and why it's not just, you know, like I go crazy when people are like, 'Oh, I did the master cleanse.] I'm like, okay, you just starved yourself and eat sugar for three weeks. Great. You know, or those detoxes.

Christine:              Yes. And we are supposed to be like, 'YAY.'Gosh.

Kendra:                  Yeah. There's a lot of weird things out there that they detox, like, yeah, those weird wraps. And I'm the wild rose cleanse. I'm not trying to bash these companies, but the wild rose cleanse that people do, it's just like, it's not really a detox. Sorry guys. These companies [inaudible].

Christine:              No no.

Kendra:                  All right.

Christine:              My end, I didn't know my Wifi is weird today, but. Okay. I think that's pretty much it. Don't forget, this is a lot to take in. We have it in the show notes on our website 360healthbizpodcast.com, where you'll find links for all the products that can Kendra mentioned today and you have a complete detox program right there. It's all there. You can literally just go and highlight it and print it out and then you have it ready for you to use, and it's going to be efficient, it's scientifically backed up. It's going to be amazing, so everything is right there, so don't forget to check that out and if you've learned, here's my challenge for you, if you have learned anything knew during this episode, in-concluding difference between US and European toilets, then please go to iTunes right now and leave us a five star review.

Kendra:                  Yeah, and it's so easy to do, like if you're on the app right now, you literally just go to the search bar search 360healthbizpodcast and then you can actually go in and do a little like five-star review. It literally takes two minutes and helps us get out there. If you want to support us, you think we're kind of cool even just a little bit. That would be the best way to tell us.

Christine:              And we are, I mean, we totally are, but it's like, yeah, even if we teach you something, if there was anything you learned, that would be amazing.

Kendra:                  Yeah. We want to know. Awesome. Well, it was super fun hanging out with you Christine.

Christine:              As always.

Kendra:                  As always and, we'll see you guys in the next episode.

Christine:              And we're recording this in December 2018. So all of you guys have a happy holidays. Even if you're listening to this in 2025 and we've changed our opinion already, never mind. We're still wishing you a beautiful 2019.

Kendra:                  Awesome. Take care Christine.

Christine:              Bye.