Tag Archives foronline health coach

Authenticity Marketing During COVID-19

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COVID-19 has rocked us all in one way or the other and has literally shifted the way that everyone does business. Luckily as online coaches, people still need what we are offering and they're going to need it more and more as time goes on. In my new video I'm going to teach you how to adjust your messaging so that you can be truly authentic to yourself and your audience.

As a small business owner, I've been feeling all the emotions over the past few weeks, and maybe you can relate. I've been worried, motivated, sad, and happy. It honestly feels like a bit of an emotional roller coaster. I realized that you probably have a lot of questions and while it's really easy to panic right now, you have to remember there's still a lot we can control and there's still a lot we can do to grow our business during this crazy & uncertain time.

I know there's a lot of you who might be feeling, "Should I even be selling during a time like this?" And the answer is yes, you absolutely should. I've seen people shaming online entrepreneurs and business owners for selling during this time, but to be honest, this is your business. This is how you support yourself and your family. You have the right to do what you need to do to continue to be able to do that.

And what that means is we may have to switch things up a little bit in order to stay more authentic. And I have three ways to stay authentic in your business throughout a global economic crisis. 

1) Adjust your messaging and address coronavirus with your people.
Even if you don't want to, you are going to have to address it. You can't just go on like it hasn't happened and every single person on the planet is feeling the effects of it in some way, shape, or form. Now the cool thing about all of this is there's very much a collective connection right now regardless of where people live in the world. Everyone is experiencing this. So we actually have the ability to relate with our fellow human beings in a way that we've actually never been able to before. So it's really important that you meet your clients where they are at, ask them how they are doing and ask them what they actually need from you during this time. It's important to be compassionate and empathetic during these times, and it's also really important to be honest. It's okay to share your struggles because by being authentic & vulnerable, you are going to be able to connect with your audience in this really deep way and you're going to be able to relate to them maybe in a way that you've never been able to before.

2) Adjust your offerings.
This is going to depend on your industry and your audience, but you definitely want to take a look at what you were offering and make sure that it is still relevant. You may need to update them or switch them up a little bit. Maybe there's something else you can offer right now that's really going to support them with what they are uniquely going through right now. What you want to look at is your pricing model - maybe you offer additional payment plans for your clients or allow them to pause their program until they get sorted. During this time, customer service is king. You really want to make sure that you are treating your clients in the best way you possibly can, that you are showing up for them and showing them that you care. Because when this is all said and done, they will remember that. And at a time where people are cutting non-essential spending, you want to be going above and beyond and make sure that they see that what you are offering is something that they really still want to keep.

3) Focus on nurturing your current audience.
I don't think anyone has the excuse of, "I'm too busy," unless they have tons of kids at home and now they're just managing kids. Obviously there's an exception there, but a lot of people are at home. They're online. So this is a great time to build relationships with your audience and show them how awesome you are, how awesome your brand is, and how you were there to nurture and support them and serve them during this time. This is a great time to not only build your social media following, but also your email list.

If you are noticing less sales during this time, remember that this is temporary and there is so much you can do by just showing up, being authentic and truly, deeply supporting your people during this time. This may be the perfect time to consider creating and launching an online group coaching program. And if you are interested in doing that, please download my Group Programs Checklist.

Your Personality & Struggles are Part Your Brand with Tracy Raftl

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LISTEN TO THE EPISODE

In this episode of 360 Health Biz Podcast, we have long time blogger & acne coach turned brand & web designer, Tracy Raftl join us to talk about branding your business. Part of Tracy’s success when she started The Love Vitamin was showing her true self – which included being vulnerable and showing her struggles with her acne.

Many health coaches and practitioners think they need to be perfect in order to help others heal and in this episode, we learn that this is not the case. Showing your audience how you got to where you are (and how you continue to grow and heal) shows your true & most authentic self.

In this episode:
- Tracy’s journey from blogging to selling ebooks for adult acne
- showing your personality in your content
- colours & fonts that portray your personality
- the importance of showing vulnerability & struggles
- brands take time to take hold

While your fonts & colours should depict your personality, branding is more than just the visuals. Your brand is your personality, your niche, your service, the way that you work with people. And the most important thing with branding is consistency – maintaining the same look & language on your website, your social media platforms, your videos and your programs & downloads.

Tracy Raftl got her start online in 2011 when she founded the super popular natural acne blog, The Love Vitamin. Now she helps unstoppable women brand themselves online, and builds them impactful, high-converting, personality-driven websites that make them feel confident to go to the next level in their business.

FREEBIE: https://littlebeastdesign.com/brand-style-quiz/

https://littlebeastdesign.com
https://www.instagram.com/tracyraftl/
https://www.pinterest.ca/tracyraftl/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/tracy-raftl/
https://www.facebook.com/littlebeastdesign/

Connect with us on social:
instagram.com/360healthbizpodcast
facebook.com/360healthbizpodcast

instagram.com/kendraperryinc
instagram.com/sleeplikeaboss_

TRANSCRIPTS

Christine:
Hello everyone and welcome to this brand new episode of our beautiful podcast, the 360 Health Biz Podcast. And we are welcoming you today to a brand new episode, which is going to be absolutely phenomenal because it's about a topic that Kendra and I love, preach, eye-roll about, vent about, all the time, so stay tuned for that. It's going to be a bomb. But before we actually get started, here's something that we want to share with you. Because we had the wonderful Leah who took the time to send us a personal message on Instagram and she says, "Kendra, thank you for your amazing podcast. I just found it this week and have been binging hardcore. You and Christine are just so fun and knowledgeable. I'm just starting my business and it has been so helpful. I did my training through the Functional Medicine Coaching Academy in collaboration with the Institute of Functional Medicine."

Christine:
Wow, we do love to be called fun and knowledgeable. Thank you very much. So we do take that and thank you so, so much for letting us know. As you know, it's always great to talk to this microphone and to this sort of camera, but not knowing if anyone actually gives a toss. So thanks for letting us know, we really appreciate it. And now without further ado, my beautiful hostess with the mostest is going to introduce our wonderful guest that we have in today. Kendra, take it away.

Kendra:
Awesome. Christine, I'm so excited for our guest today. It kinda goes way back. I'm actually super excited to introduce her because I actually first started following her probably... I don't even know. It was probably 10 years ago, maybe even longer, when I was struggling with acne and I was really interested in natural solutions and I stumbled across her website, which was a huge blog at the time and it probably still is, and I was so inspired by her and her blog and all her articles that it actually led to me starting my own blog, which was not as successful or not even close. It wasn't successful at all, but that's okay. And funny enough, I actually wrote my first guest post on her website and it was about coffee enemas, which is really-

Christine:
[crosstalk 00:02:08] baby. I'm not surprised. Obviously it's got something-

Tracy Raftl:
I was trying to remember and I was like "she wrote a blog post, I know it was something to do with poop" but I couldn't remember what. Of course, coffee enemas.

Kendra:
Totally, and you know what guys? I still love my coffee enemas. I still do them. I think they're great, but I remember at the time, just there were a lot of comments that were like, "This is terrible, who would ever do this?" And I was like, I feel so bad about myself. It was so new. I'd never put myself out there on the internet, so it was quite the experience, [crosstalk 00:02:37] but I kept in touch with Tracy over the years. We connected again through functional diagnostic nutrition when she did the program and then we've kept in touch just through social media. So I'm really excited to introduce Tracy Raftl and just to give her a quick introduction, she started online in 2011 when she founded the super popular natural acne blog, The Love Vitamin. Now she helps unstoppable women brand themselves online and builds them impactful, high converting, personality driven websites that makes them feel confident to take their business to the next level. And guys, you should definitely check out her shit because her design is unbelievable.

Christine:
Beautiful. I'm very jealous I have to say.[crosstalk 00:03:24] Very, super envious. With love.

Tracy Raftl:
Thank you.

Kendra:
Thanks Tracy. What's going on?

Tracy Raftl:
Wow. Well thank you for that lovely introduction. It's lovely to be here with you ladies. What we're going to be talking about today, I believe, is just putting yourself out there and just being 100% real and my journey with The Love Vitamin. I think the reason that it was so damn successful was because I was so vulnerable, real about my struggles. So I started The Love vitamin in, like you said, 2011. I was in my early twenties and I had horrible skin. It was horrific. It was so bad. And if you've ever had skin troubles, you understand how embarrassing that is, how... not just embarrassing, but just soul crushing it is. It's just really, really emotionally painful.

Tracy Raftl:
So I, like Kendra back then, I was reading other people's acne blogs and I got really inspired and I thought, "You know what, I will have to share, I can do this." So I started the blog and I had all of those thoughts where it was like, "Well I've cleared up the majority of the severe acne I had," but I was still struggling with mild acne. I was still struggling with the fear of acne, which was a big thing, and so I had those thoughts where it was like, "Oh, who am I to be talking about this? I should have perfect skin, otherwise why should I even bother?" But the thing was, I didn't do that. I shared all of my struggles. I talked about the experiments I was doing to heal that last part of my acne. I talked about all the emotions that I was feeling, about every time I got a pimple, even if it wasn't that bad, it was still emotionally devastating because just how intense it was when my skin was bad. I still have that.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, just all those emotions. That fear was... it was definitely still there, but I explored all of that on my blog and I believe that that was actually what made it so successful, because people could relate to it. They knew that I wasn't perfect. They knew that... Yeah, people are intimidated by people that are perfect.

Christine:
When did you realize that that was your secret spice, so to say?

Tracy Raftl:
I don't know if I ever realized it, I just kind of did it. I think, I mean... Yeah, I studied business. I took courses to learn how to blog, and I think they recommended, don't hide yourself, don't hide your struggle. And I think being an open book just comes naturally to me. I can't keep secrets basically. So, it was just really natural and I think I saw some of the bloggers that I was following, that's what they were doing as well and I recognized that that was why I felt connected to them, even if I didn't recognize it.

Kendra:
I'll never forget Tracy, I'll never forget the photos of when you had really, and you just posted those online. And I remember just being like "wow", I can't believe she's doing it. But I was so grateful about it because I was just like "She really has struggled with this." To see the transition and I even remember later on I think, I don't know if you were in, I feel like I'm like such a creep cause I like know your whole life. I remember I think you were in Australia and you've broken out a little bit and you were showing and taking pictures and you were like, "I got this like big cyst, like between my eyebrows or whatever." It almost couldn't breathe because I was so ashamed of that at the time. And I just hid it and I would hide inside. And I just so grateful that you were just out there, baring it all.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. I mean that was a big change because before I started the blog, it was like, I like acne was, I was not going to like, even if they could see it everywhere, it was like that was something I was never gonna like the topic was never gonna come up between me and anyone. And I found that was so, so stressful because it was like, "They can all see it."

Kendra:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
It was like this thing that I couldn't admit or talk about with anyone and it was, it just felt like a pressure cooker. It was like "I am struggling with this. I can't say anything about it." Then when I decided to start the blog and put it all out there, it was a big relief actually. So you listening, you might be feeling the same way where it's like, Oh, you might have this weight of like, Oh, "I'm still kind of struggling with this. I'm not 100%."

Kendra:
yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
Or whatever.

Kendra:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
That you might feel like that's a weight.

Christine:
or have a little setback, you know?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, exactly.

Christine:
A lot of people who are just when they're sick, they have a setback and they get they're old symptoms back and it's like, "Oh no, I'm not an expert anymore because..." but it was circumstantial. So yeah, I guess it's nice to [crosstalk 00:08:47]

Tracy Raftl:
Exactly, and even talking through that so that people know when they get setbacks, it doesn't mean that yeah, it's all over, it's all coming back forever, which I know is easy to.

Christine:
Totally. And so what about[crosstalk 00:09:01]

Kendra:
Because I mean most health coaches for the most part are in this because of their own struggle. Right.

Tracy Raftl:
Exactly.

Kendra:
And a lot of people are for niching in the thing that they struggled with. And, I mean, I talked to a lot of health coaches and I just see a lot of them being like, "well I can't talk about anxiety because I still have anxiety or I can't talk about this because I don't have this. I'm super passionate about anxiety. I want to talk about it, but I still have it, so how can I talk about it?" And so they're a bit paralyzed by the fact that they think they're waiting for the moment when that goes away, before they can start speaking about it. You think that does their audience a disservice?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, 100%. Because I mean like you can speak to it Kendra like what if I had just decided to never say anything? They want to know everything that's going on. They want to know that you're struggling too. It's so relatable.

Kendra:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
It really helps people if you're just upfront with it.

Christine:
So what about those who come to you? Because obviously now your specialist is in branding. You don't have, cause I'm one of those who don't have their own struggle. For me it was the opposite. I was feeling illegitimate cause I didn't have the struggles. You are this branding specialist now in the house. I'm really excited because you see these two people and you advise them, and you coach them, and consult with them. How do you do that? Basically you figured out at some point that honesty and being out there and vulnerable is the key. When did you figure out, so how do you, first of all, how do you coach these people? But also what was your process to understand what it was you were doing and how did you teach that?

Tracy Raftl:
You're talking about the branding part of it?

Christine:
Yeah. And just being you, that is actually branding.

Tracy Raftl:
Right.

Christine:
I don't think a lot of people know that that belongs to the world or branding. For them branding is a logo.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. It's definitely much more than that.

Christine:
Why do you think that the struggle with niching will feeling legitimate has something to do with branding? I find a lot of people have no clue what branding actually is.

Tracy Raftl:
Right.

Christine:
So how did that kaleidoscope of thing happen for you?

Tracy Raftl:
Right. Well let's discuss what brand [crosstalk 00:11:20]

Christine:
I know it's lot. We'll deal with it.

Kendra:
So many bombs of questions there.

Christine:
I know. [crosstalk 00:11:27]

Tracy Raftl:
That's a really good question there with the logo because a lot of people think branding is just a logo. Branding is, the whole thing of what your business is. It's basically the perception of what other people think of you and your business. It's a culmination of the visual design, but it's also your brand's personality, your niche, your service, the way that you work with people. The way that you speak. With Kendra for example, you're very kinda to the point and you swear and whatever that's part of your brand, right? It's like what we can expect from you. And so I always, always recommend, I mean... the majority of the time you like if you're a coach. Your brand should be based on your personality. They are slightly different. Your brand is an entity and you are an entity. But your brand should be based on your personality. It doesn't have to be everything that you are, but it shouldn't be something that you're completely not.

Christine:
I love that. So what if you're not included?

Tracy Raftl:
If you're lazy and complaining, you probably don't want to like [crosstalk 00:12:57] too much.

Christine:
Even though that's a brand on YouTube.

Kendra:
Your brand, Christine, lazy and complaining. You like own that shit. It's so funny.

Christine:
I own my laziness like a boss.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah.[crosstalk 00:13:04] You could even put that into your brand, right? That could be a thing,

Christine:
I do.

Tracy Raftl:
You want to highlight the better things and then you could throw in some of that as well. And that can make you relatable as well, right? Because it's like, "yeah, I'm lazy." So it basically, but if you, you know, we're very multifaceted people, right? We all have very... so many different parts of our personality and things that we are, your brand doesn't have to broadcast every single thing that you are. But if you are a super funny person, you probably don't want to create a brand that's super staunch and serious or if you are super chill and soft spoken, you don't want to have like a bold, brash kind of, possibly swearing brand, it doesn't work. People get that there's something off about it.

Tracy Raftl:
When someone is trying to be, someone that they're not, it just comes off as sort of fake. People might not quite know what it is, but there's just something off about it that doesn't sit right and it doesn't feel good to you. It's hard trying to be someone that you're not, right? Sometimes it's hard to be who we are too because we don't know who we are. That's a whole other story. If you're not a funny person, you're trying to be funny. That's hard. It makes business, it makes you more attractive to your ideal client and it makes business just feel better for you.

Christine:
Do you find that people actually always know who they are or they come across as, so you say, for example,

Tracy Raftl:
No.

Christine:
If you're funny, you might not want a super serious brand. Do you find that funny people know that they're funny.

Tracy Raftl:
Not always.[crosstalk 00:15:02]

Christine:
How they come across.

Tracy Raftl:
They very much get caught up in like, Oh, "I think I should be this or I think I shouldn't be bad, or I'm inspired by that person so I should have a brand exactly like them." And then it's like, "Oh shit, this is really hard because this isn't me at all." So that's why working with a brand expert can be really helpful because they can see you a lot clearer than you can see yourself. If you don't have the money to work with a brand expert, you can ask your family and friends and say, "Okay, give me five characteristics or personality traits that you feel like sums me up." Ask a few different people to get sort of an idea and go from there. I think that's a really great start.[crosstalk 00:15:47]

Christine:
I just want to say, you have to watch the video guys because Kendra and I have both like, [crosstalk 00:15:53] like bobbing their heads.

Tracy Raftl:
I like this validation. Thank you.

Kendra:
Were just like yup.

Christine:
Yup. Preach sister.

Kendra:
I think it's such a good idea. It's something that we actually had our mastermind members doing when we did our a lesson on branding. We were like, you got to figure out who you are. You got to figure out how you talk. You need to speak in your voice. The way I talk, that's just the way I talk. If you meet me in person, what you see is what you get. It's the same shit. But I think, yeah, you're right. A lot of people don't know who they are, they don't understand their personality. And I think that's another reason why building a business is such a deep dive into personal development.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, it is for sure. You definitely learn a lot about yourself if you want to succeed anyway. You really have to get in touch with that.

Christine:
Are there any certain things that you ask people to do before they come work with you? Because I guess if they're not ready to actually figure out who they are, which might be much more challenging than they actually understand. Being yourself is one of the most difficult things to do. How do you help them?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. It's either really difficult or really easy.

Kendra:
Yes.

Tracy Raftl:
Well if you're getting a website done with me, I pretty much make it a requirement that we do brand name work before that. I have a really in depth questionnaire and of course that goes with it to explain all of this stuff step-by-step. They fill it out and then they get consulting time with me. So it's kind of like I make them do it because I don't want to build them a website without them.

Kendra:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
Understanding this stuff because then your website's going to suck and it's not gonna speak to who you want it to speak to and it's not going to be effective. And I don't want to keep the money for that. So we always do that. That's what I'm there to help with. Does that answer the question?

Kendra:
Totally. Yeah. And I want to circle back around to this like idea of vulnerability and sharing. Cause,

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah.

Kendra:
Obviously, the definition of being vulnerable I think is to put yourself in harm's way or to make yourself,

Tracy Raftl:
You're right.

Kendra:
[crosstalk 00:17:59] Right. I think because of what it is, it's scary and it is unbearable.

Tracy Raftl:
Oh yeah.

Kendra:
So what advice would you give to people who, they're new, maybe they haven't shared their story too much or done anything too vulnerable. How can they get started? Cause obviously that you don't just want to go from like zero to nothing cause that's gonna make people shit their pants basically.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah.

Christine:
How can you help them to go, let's take a medium like posting salads or letters on Instagram. To becoming vulnerable. It seems like such a stretch.

Tracy Raftl:
It does seem like a leap. I would start with just sharing your personal journey with how you got to here. If it is your health struggle or proceeding your case. You said you don't have that health struggle, but how did you actually get to, you must have some stories. So how you got to where you are here helping people. Just share that story, but share it in a little more detail than you would and it should feel a little bit scary not too scary, not to shit your pants scary, but just add a little bit in there so that you feel a little bit uncomfortable. You have to feel a little uncomfortable in order to get comfortable with that memorability. I know that's scary. I know. I like to think of fear as just think of it as a sensation. You're not going to die. Nothing's going to happen. The reason that we fear vulnerability is because of that danger in our heads of "People are going to judge me, I'm going to be exiled or whatever."

Kendra:
[crosstalk 00:19:44] I mean let's be honest some people will judge you and you know,

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. That's the other thing is that some people will judge you and they just don't fucking matter. And I know that is so hard for a lot of people. We want everybody's like us, but if we really want to stand out and speak to those people who are just so bright for us, we have to just not give a shit about the other people, which I know is something that is learned. It's not always, it doesn't come naturally, but once you start to put yourself out there and you start to feel that connection with people, hopefully you'll get to the point where it's okay if some people don't like you.

Kendra:
I agree.

Tracy Raftl:
Happens to all of us.

Kendra:
It does, the more you get out there, I mean I offend people all the time just because sometimes an ass in person, it happens, people take things I say the wrong way and it's fine. But I think it's always a choice whether you want to engage and you don't have to.

Tracy Raftl:
Exactly.

Kendra:
Right?

Tracy Raftl:
No.

Kendra:
And be over with it. But if do choose to engage, like I recommend that people wait until their nervous system has calmed down before they [crosstalk 00:20:54]

Christine:
Sleep over it.

Tracy Raftl:
Everybody who's successful has some people who are, you know, maybe going to write a mean comment. You get 10 comments and you focus on that mean asshole. It's like fuck that guy.

Christine:
And everyone does that. I mean it's just,

Tracy Raftl:
I know like I used to make YouTube videos, I ended up turning off the comments cause people are just fucking assholes.

Kendra:
YouTube is the worst

Tracy Raftl:
Oh yeah.

Kendra:
It's the worst, Cause I think people have accounts that aren't, you can't connect them to who they are.

Christine:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, it's so bad.

Kendra:
We'll file and whatever. But YouTube sometimes. I mean I've had people be like, "How could I take advice from someone with such a stupid hat?" I live in Canada and it's cold in here.

Tracy Raftl:
Don't make fun of my tuque okay?[crosstalk 00:21:44] Kendra and I are both Canadian by the way.

Kendra:
Yeah. Christine's like, "I don't know what's going on the American,"[crosstalk 00:21:54]

Christine:
What are you speaking about? I don't understand. It's a hat.

Tracy Raftl:
It's a tuque.

Kendra:
People in the States called tuque's like what I'm wearing right now, a beanie, which is ridiculous because I think of a beanie of one of those little [crosstalk 00:22:05]

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah me too with the propeller

Kendra:
That covers like the baldhead of,

Christine:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
It's a tuque.

Christine:
A what?

Kendra:
A Canadian word. A tuque.

Tracy Raftl:
A tuque.

Christine:
All right Canadian.

Tracy Raftl:
It's French Canadian.[crosstalk 00:22:20]

Kendra:
Anyways.

Christine:
So I think we covered like the most important, figuring out who you are either through other people's eyes, but people who you trust or mistake. Don't make a survey on, I dunno, some stranger's website or something like that. And then,

Tracy Raftl:
yeah, get a few opinions.

Christine:
Get a few opinions but people who you trust. How do you translate that into your online presence? Let's put it that way.

Tracy Raftl:
Okay.

Christine:
Well even your own presence, like even the way that you want to show up. I think it's so, like when you do videos, should you dress a certain way? I kind of, I don't wear makeup today, but usually when I know that I'm bashing the videos, I polish myself up a little bit, which people could say it's not authentic, but how do you translate? "Okay and I know I'm comfortable with who I am. How do I represent that in terms of me, my colors, my style, maybe even my fun?" How does that all happen?

Tracy Raftl:
Right. That's why I'm getting really clear on your brand, personality is so important. So when you have those five or more. Start with five, sort of descriptors, then just think about... sometimes it's easier to think about somebody else who has these descriptors and think about, well, how would you know if one of them is, funny, straight talking, whatever. How would that person speak? Right? If they had that personality, how would, like your visual presence. So, for example, if you are like a bold, really bold kind of brash person, you probably want to have bold colors to match that. Right? If your kind of a more soft..

Christine:
We can't hear you.

Kendra:
We just lose audio?

Christine:
Yeah. Tracy? For some reason...

Kendra:
We just lost your audio.

Christine:
I don't know.

Kendra:
That's super weird. Oh shit. Should restart the meeting or?

Christine:
It just went. Maybe if you just quickly leave the room and come back.

Kendra:
Do you want to just exit and come back in? That'll probably fix it. Oh man, you're getting so fired up there.

Christine:
I know. It was just a juicy part. I'm just like, no.

Kendra:
I don't know. I've had these weird zoom things before.

Christine:
Can you hear us Tracy? Okay. So just leave the room, exit the meeting and then come back in.

Tracy Raftl:
Okay. Actually.

Christine:
Oh, now it's working.

Tracy Raftl:
Let me do, I don't know, video settings. Let me just choose the different mic maybe just to,

Kendra:
That's fine.

Tracy Raftl:
Okay.

Kendra:
Cool.

Christine:
So what did we hear last?

Tracy Raftl:
Right. What we were saying?

Christine:
So juicy, it was, Oh, like imagining someone with similar traits, but how would they speak if you have bold colors?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, right, exactly. I think I was saying about the visual style of it. You want to choose colors for example, that you like, but also match the brand personality. So if you're bold and brash, choose bold colors, don't choose really pastel muted colors.If you are more soft-spoken, you can choose, softer colors because otherwise it won't match, right? You want to have it just kind of amplify that.

Tracy Raftl:
When you're writing for example, think about how you would actually say that out loud if you were talking to a friend. So if you're writing something, use slang, use contractions. Make it really informal. Don't write it like your college essay, right? You want to write it like you would actually speak and it's helpful to actually say it out loud when you write it. When you're on video, exactly. Just say it how you would actually speak to a friend. Don't try, you swear or don't, if that's not something you do and what you should wear. Generally it's, wear something that you feel comfortable in, like don't wear something that you would never wear. You are talking about, "Oh I like to put on makeup." That's fine. You probably put on makeup if you go out for dinner or something. Right? Like it's like a nice version of you.

Christine:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
You're not like wearing something that, it's not like makeup just doesn't feel like you or that not,

Christine:
No

Tracy Raftl:
Right? So that's still you and that's totally fine. Does that make sense?

Christine:
Yeah. What would maybe use the highlight? Like if I look at my wardrobe just visually, it's pretty muted I would say. But then you have the occasional total crazy frog that I do.

Tracy Raftl:
Right.

Christine:
So just something pop that you can use sometimes, I guess.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. And something like that. It's like, well you probably don't wear those all the time, but you can just throw that in sometimes. Cause that's part of who you are.

Christine:
Yeah. And it's so interesting because I got, usually my assistant knows me really well, so she creates my newsletters and it all looks very branded cause she knows me very well. But today, she sent me a draft and I was just saying, I didn't know why, it doesn't jive. There was a lot of purple in there and things. Oh no. It's the first time it ever happened. I find that is also, it's difficult to let someone else know what your brand is if they're suppose to do, Kendra and I, we don't do our posts anymore. Like, yes we do, but we don't do graphics for example. I find it really helpful if you do work with a brand specialist to just have that run sheet. [crosstalk 00:28:10] somebody out there who have no clue what we're talking about, what that process is, what the pros are of actually investing in a process like this.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, exactly. It's very important to, in building your brand is to use the same visual. Those same personality, same tone of voice to be consistent across all of your platforms. So that's your website, your social media, in-person video, whatever. Everywhere you are is to use the same things because then people start to get to know you, they start to recognize you. Consistency. They trust it a little bit more. You seem more professional. To have that consistency, it's really, really helpful to have what you were talking about is a brand guide. So it's just a document that sort of lays out all of these things. So, here's the colors that we use and here's the actual like hex code, which is like the exact code for that color so that you can use it in graphics.

Tracy Raftl:
Choose some, a few fonts and stick to those. Choose that personality tone of voice. That's kind of the basics. There's a bit more if you're working with a brand specialist, but if you're just doing this yourself, you can just create this document and just have it there so that when you're making something, you can refer to it and just use it to just be consistent with what doing. And then when you or if you ever, have a team like Christina and Kendra, then it's really, really, really helpful because you need your team to understand what the brand is and how to use it consistently. That's what a branding specialist can help with. But even if you don't work with someone, I recommend definitely just putting something together for your own reference.

Christine:
Yeah. How do you see businesses shift in terms of success once they've worked with a brand specialist? Like if we have a before and after kind of thing?

Tracy Raftl:
There's never any like obvious,

Christine:
You will make six figures when you work with me.

Tracy Raftl:
Can't say that. If you are just starting out in your business, you're probably gonna see less upfront, kind of a change. Because branding takes time to take hold, right? It's good to really establish that right away because then your brand has time to grow. People have time to get to know your brand, and you're going to accelerate a lot faster than if you didn't do this work.

Christine:
Right

Tracy Raftl:
If your sort of like, you've been in business for a while and you're like, kind of know what you're doing and you've got, you know, but you just want to take it to the next level, I think that's sort of the point where it can really make a big difference. And a lot of that can actually be just from confidence.

Christine:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
In having all of that defined. Having that brand guide, knowing who your ideal customer is, how to speak to them. Having that really professional visual kind of appeal, that makes such a big difference in people's confidence. So way back in the day with The Love Vitamin, I think it was like 2013 or something, I was making like, I don't know, two or $3,000 a month or something. It was great cause I was making it for my own business,

Kendra:
True.

Tracy Raftl:
But it wasn't like a lot of money. It's kind of hard to live on that. I had always kind of done my own branding and it wasn't great back then. And so I decided to invest in a new website, and new branding and it was that, that kind of gave me the confidence to put out a new course and sell at a higher price. And my business went, that's when I made six figures. So that's a very, clear example of what it can do for you. It's just, it can really take things to the next level. But if I had done that right away, probably not, but it might've accelerated quicker.

Christine:
Yeah. Plus, I think people also need to realize that they probably need to invest in a branding specialist on a regular basis because you just change.

Tracy Raftl:
Exactly.

Christine:
My brand, Strange Brookside, psychic zillion times. I'm happy with the one I have now, but not looking at yours and again, thinking maybe in six months I actually am going to invest again or I mean both Kendra and I have worked with Jamie Jensen to figure out our stories and figure out our main points and because you just have those blind spots and they evolve and they change.

Tracy Raftl:
Absolutely. Yeah.

Christine:
I'll give you that. It's something you regularly invest in as you change, as a business changes.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, for sure. And I think when you very first start out, often you, sometimes you need to experiment a little like decent DIY, just sorta like get a little bit of a direction because businesses do evolve pretty quickly. You're like, "Oh, I thought I was going to do that, but actually I want to do that." And experimenting a little bit in the beginning is helpful. And then when you sort of start to get, I think that's a good time to invest and then, but yeah, businesses are always evolving. It's like something that felt like you four year, three or four years ago, that might be completely different now. Maybe you have new programs or maybe you just have a completely different style or feel about you. That's how I felt about my website in 2014 when I made it over and then my business went way up. That was me back then. But now I don't feel like that really resonates with me now. So it's like things just evolve. So yeah,

Kendra:
It's such a good conversation because I'm always harping on health coaches who invest like three or $4,000 in a website right out of the gate.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah.

Kendra:
Which, I would never recommend. And I think I was making a story about that and I saw you watch my story and I was like, "Oh, I hope Tracy doesn't take [crosstalk 00:34:25]

Tracy Raftl:
I was like, "Kendra."

Kendra:
She's gonna give me shit for that. [crosstalk 00:34:29] But you don't know who you are. Your niche might change. Like there's so many things that might change and you have so little like business intelligence at that point that you don't really know what works. And I can't tell you how many coaches who have invested three, $4,000 that they didn't really have in a website that not only looks like crap but like isn't what they actually want and isn't serving them. So I'm like you want to just test things out. Personally I think you can start getting clients without even having a website. You know what I think to start like just take the step like get on social media and have a way to build your email list, like have your offer. But once you start working with clients you'll get a sense of who you are and what you actually want to do. And I think at that point when you have that higher intelligence and what you are doing.

Tracy Raftl:
Exactly. And I'm first to admit a website isn't everything, but it is an important piece of your marketing that people can go to and get a sense for what you do and who you do it for. But it's not everything. And yeah, I agree with like when you, right out of the gate it's just, it's not the investment that's the best. I think it's usually when you're like ready to of, yeah.

Christine:
And it's so interesting cause I wasn't a monster man last October, where we met and we were all kind of six figureish rich hovering people above, below just below, but similar States of businesses. And they were on two or three brand specialists there. And one of the biggest struggles was that people had a completely wrong perception of what branding actually was. So they attracted a lot of newbies who were expecting just a website. I didn't understand that they had to do all of this ground work. And so now you really have to differentiate, well what I tell people between a website designer who will take a branding portfolio and then do the website for you and a brand specialist, it's two very different things. A lot of people have no idea. We were just brainstorming, is brand strategists still the correct term? Because it's eighties in a way, what people think that it's just such an interesting development in that profession.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. Branding is definitely, it's an ethereal thing that people think they know what it is, but it's not really, but it's so important that you need it. And I mean it's definitely more important than a website in itself. So that's why I said it's kind of a non negotiable, when I work with people I make them a website. But yeah, I had no direction.

Christine:
Yes. So anyone listening before you invest into Facebook ads or before you invest into other crap for thousands and thousands, take your time and when you think you know, then get to a brand specialist and be ready to be ripped apart and put together again.

Tracy Raftl:
100% I think if it is like, yeah, you can go out and do your marketing, but marketing takes a lot of time, money, effort that you would get so much more return if you were really clear on this brand stuff first.

Christine:
Yes.

Tracy Raftl:
There was something I posted on my Instagram that I saw somewhere, some quote that was like, what was the quote? Now I'm gonna forget. It was like marketing is asking someone on a date and branding is the reason they say yes. That's kind of like that and underlying [crosstalk 00:38:04] I like it.

Christine:
I like this. Sometimes people are like,

Kendra:
Oh, it's good shit. Awesome.

Tracy Raftl:
I didn't make that up. So yeah, I mean to

Kendra:
Some person credit out there, so Tracy, I would love you to tell the audience like how people, I know you have a little like gift. You have your little brand quiz, which I actually did and I think I was minimalist chic. Is that a thing?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. We're all chic.

Kendra:
Sweet, cause I'm totally a minimalist. I'm like, yes.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, I like that one.

Kendra:
How can you access that quiz?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. If you go to a littlebeesdesign.com/quiz or if you just got a Little bees design that you'll see it. It's everywhere. What brands sell are you or what's your brand personality? It's based on visual branding knots. Not so much the underlying personality, but we get way deep into that if we work together.

Christine:
So can I just have one last question? How did you come up with the Little Bees design?

Tracy Raftl:
Well at first I was like I'll just name it after me and then I had a friend who was like, "ah, don't do that name." It's probably an interesting insight. I was racking my brain. Well, I'm a very, very tiny person. I'm like very short. I'm small. There's that. I mostly driven and ambitious, so it was kind of those put together.

Christine:
It's super cute. I love it.

Tracy Raftl:
And I have two little dogs. So they factored in, there was, it was a bunch of stuff, but it just felt right. It was like, yes, it's memorable and it just feels right to me.

Kendra:
So Tracy, do you still do The Love Vitamin or is that kind of,

Tracy Raftl:
I don't put any effort into it, but it exists. And if you need help with acne, all my programs are there and the 500 blog posts or whatever are still there, which is crazy to me. Then I run that many. If you want to check that out, you can go to thelovevitamin.com and yeah, see what I've done with that because it was, it's been super successful and if you want to like have an example, it's worth checking out.

Christine:
Brilliant. Well thank you so much for your brain and sharing [crosstalk 00:40:18] listeners. I feel this was really clear about what branding is and what branding isn't and why it's important. And again, like we really, we really hope people take this to heart because I think it's going to save you tons of money.

Kendra:
Yeah, absolutely. Awesome.

Tracy Raftl:
All right. Thank you.

Christine:
Well that's it, shall we call it a day?

Kendra:
I think we should call it a day. Thanks so much guys. We appreciate it. If you loved this episode, as always, we are asking you for those two minutes to give us a five star review on iTunes or wherever else you can give reviews. I think it's just iTunes. I don't think so. You can on Spotify. I'm not sure. Anyways, if you can give her a review, give it to us and we will give you a shout out on air [crosstalk 00:41:03] or a beautiful face's and like the weird things we do, what we record, you guys can check out our YouTube channel and watch the video for this episode. And I think that's it. So we'll see you guys in one week for our biz mom episode, which is our super quick, quick tip series where we just blow your head off with a fist and in two weeks for the next full episode. Thanks Tracy.

Tracy Raftl:
yeah, thank you.

Kendra:
Talk soon. Bye.

Tracy Raftl:
Bye.

How to Identify Your Customer Pain Points as a Health Coach

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Pain points are a specific problem that prospective customers of your business are experiencing, and are specific to your niche. The truth is all humans want to avoid pain, and your ideal client is experiencing pain around their specific health issue. They hate it, it bothers them, and they desperately want to get rid of it. So if you want to sell your product or service, you have to explain to your ideal client how you're going to help their problem go away. And if you can show how your awesome health coaching program is going to get rid of their health issue, they are going to invest.

But if you want to identify the pain points of your ideal client, you have to know who your niche is. This is a really big blocking factor for health coaches. 

The most important thing about pain points, is that they need to come from your ideal client, and not you. You might be able to extract some pain points from you if you are someone who has suffered from the same things as your ideal client, but it's really important that you get those pain points from the real humans struggling with whatever your niche is struggling with at this very moment.

Let's say you're just starting out so you're brand new. You've never had a client and you don't have a way to find people to talk to. Your niche is out there - there are tons of people online looking for someone like you to help them! So go out there and do the research and find these people and figure out what are they actually struggling with.

There are six really amazing ways to connect with your ideal client and see what they're struggling with. 

1) If you've ever had a client who has suffered with your niche problem, ask them. Ask them questions or just pay attention to when they speak. And if not, maybe you have a friend, or a family member, or a spouse, or someone else who has struggled with your niche problem who wouldn't mind if you asked them a few questions.

2) A great place to learn about your ideal client pain points is in Facebook groups. There are lots of Facebook groups around all different types of health problems. Join a group that is specific to your niche and look at what are they posting, what are they struggling with, what questions are they asking. Don't go in there and try to sell. There's usually rules around that and that could get you booted out. But, you can go in there and just ask questions, engage, be a fly on the wall.

3) Outside of Facebook, you could go to Instagram and you could follow someone who is in a similar niche and look at their posts and see who's commenting and what are the questions.

4) If you have any amount of following, even if you only have 50 to a hundred people on Instagram, or LinkedIn, or wherever it is you're hanging out, get out there and ask them. Use Instagram Stories and use the question  or poll features and ask questions like, "What are you actually struggling with? What is the hardest thing about having anxiety? What drives you the most insane about having anxiety?" There are so many different ways to actually get out there and engage with people who have this issue.

5) Send out a survey. Basically, I sent out a survey and I bribed people. I find if you want people to take action you can offer them a chance to win a gift certificate or some sort of prize if they complete the survey. And based on survey results, you can use those results to create your content.

6) Draw from your own personal experience. A lot of us end up niching in health issues that we have struggled with personally. You don't want to use only your own pain points from your experience because we all have unique experiences and you want to really extract those pain points from a wide variety of your ideal clients. But if you have had personal experience in your niche, then you can definitely draw on your own personal experience and take pain points from your own life.

What I challenge you to do is go out there and do this research and find 30 pain points from 30 different people who are struggling with what you are niching in and write them down. And then go and solve each of those pain points. You've just done 30 days of content and you can just go out there and share it. At the end of 30 days you can literally just repeat because the truth is not everyone's going to see all your content, and it's not actually a bad thing to be repetitive online. This is a fantastic way to create content - video, Instagram, Pinterest, you name it.

Remember that my "Find Your Profitable Niche" Workshop is still open for registration. On April 3rd @ 10am PST, I will be hosting a live, 2-hour, interactive training that will help you identify a niche for your business that helps you attract new clients and create content with ease. Reserve your spot: kendra-perry.com/niche-workshop

Authenticity Marketing (How to Attract Clients by Being Yourself)

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Authenticity is a big word in the online marketing world right now, but what does it actually mean and how do you actually leverage it in your business marketing strategy? I used to show up online as the person I thought I should be rather than the person who I actually was. And truthfully, my business didn't started to take off until I started to be myself. And this is exactly what I want to teach you.

First off, you may be wondering what authenticity marketing is. It's marketing your business or your brand by showing up as yourself and as who you truly are. Authenticity marketing would be telling someone that your program or service actually isn't a good fit for them and that there might be someone else who would be a better fit for them instead. Inauthentic marketing would be pretending that the webinar is live even though it's a replay. Inauthentic marketing is only showing the highlight reel on your social media and not talking about any of the real stuff. Inauthentic marketing would be pretending that your health condition is fully healed when in fact you are still in the thick of it. Inauthentic marketing is marketing your business or your brand in any other way that doesn't represent you and who you are.

So let's jump into 5 tips on how to utilize authenticity marketing in your business. 

1) Identify your core values.
If you're going to show up as who you are online, you have to learn about who you actually are. And this starts with defining what your core values are. You should sit down and come up with 5 to 10 values that really define who you are as a human. Your values are the things that define who you are and the things that you are unwilling to sacrifice.

Need some inspiration? My core values include fun, laughter, integrity, adventure and connection to nature. Once you know what your core values are, you'll get a better idea of who you are and what you stand for. This is going to help guide your business decisions. And ultimately what you end up saying yes to.

2) Speak with your own voice.
When you show up on social media, like Instagram, Facebook or YouTube, you want to make sure that you are speaking with your own voice and using the words that you actually use. So this means that you should talk the way that you talk in real life. If you have a sarcastic sense of humor, crack some sarcastic jokes. If you like to laugh, don't be afraid to laugh. You just want to make sure that you talk the talk - your talk.

3) Serve first, sell second.
When you are focused on serving your clients and finding the best outcome for them, regardless of what that is, you actually treat your audience like humans. People really like it when they feel that you actually care about them. And remember, when you have a serve first, sell second mentality, that means you're always going to find the best outcome for your audience member, for your potential client, even if it's not ultimately working with you.

A key thing to remember with this mentality: it doesn't mean that you're just giving free information and breaking your boundaries. What it means is that you're being generous with your content, giving as much value as possible and really caring about the people who are following you and always trying to help them as much as you possibly can.

4) Embrace the haters.
When you really embrace those interesting or unique or polarizing sides of your personality, ultimately some people just aren't going to like you. And guess what? That is okay. We cannot make everyone happy and like us. This can be tough to swallow because a lot of us have been conditioned to be people pleasers and we secretly want everyone to like us. But when you are authentic and you're showing up as yourself, some people they just aren't going to resonate with you. Ultimately the people who don't connect with us, they just weren't meant for us anyways. So embrace the haters, give them some love, and let them go.

5) Share your story.
Be honest about exactly where you are right now. A big fear I see in a lot of health coaches is that they're afraid to share what they know about something because personally maybe they are still going through it. They don't think they have any right or they don't feel like an expert. But people want the truth. And the fact that you still struggle with whatever you're talking about, doesn't mean you can't speak on that topic. And it doesn't mean you are an impostor. What it does is it makes you real.

If you found this helpful and you want to get more tips and tricks from me for your health and wellness business, make sure to subscribe to my weekly business tips because I send out a super juicy, super actionable tip every single Tuesday to my email subscribers.

Lead Magnet Examples for Health Coaches (5 HIGH-CONVERTING OPTIONS)

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What the F is a lead magnet?

A lead magnet is probably one of the most important things that you offer your ideal audience as a health coach. It can also be called a freebie or a free opt-in - basically it's something that you offer to your ideal audience of high value in exchange for their email address so you can build your email list. Unfortunately, not all lead magnets are made the same. Some of them work, and some will fail. In my new video I'm going to teach you the five highest converting lead magnets for health coaches. ​

My five years of running a business, I've created a ton of lead magnets, but what worked when I first started out doesn't work very well today. These days, my lead magnets have a very high conversion rate and I have easily built my email list without ads by about 10 to 15 subscribers per day.​

Before we consider which types of lead magnets work and which ones don't, we really need to consider how humans interact in the modern world. In 2019 people are busy AF. They describe themselves as busy, they wear a ton of hats, they have a ton going on at all times. You might even call them a bit distracted. What that really means is that people overextend themselves and they really lack free time, so if your lead magnet is going to bring new leads onto your email list, your lead magnet needs to align with today's busy world.

So first off, your lead magnet needs to be short and easy to consume. When I first started marketing online, e-books were a big thing. You could offer a free e-book and people would opt in, and there was a chance that they might actually read the entire e-book. E-books don't work anymore. Those are pretty outdated, and the reason is because of how people interact in their lives. They have a million things going on at all times. So if you offer a 30 or 50 or a hundred page e-book, people are going to feel pretty overwhelmed by that, and they might not even opt in to begin with. The chances of them actually finishing that e-book and getting to the end of it are slim to none. And remember, you actually do want people to complete your lead magnet. You really want to see all the value you can give. You want them to get all that great information, and of course you also want them to get to the end where you say, "Hey, if you like this information, you maywant to book a free call or join my group program."

So your lead magnet shouldn't take the reader longer than 5 to 10 minutes to actually get through it. Once you complete your lead magnet, read through it and time yourself. If it takes you longer than 10 minutes to get through it, it's too long and people aren't going to get there, so you should edit it down to hit that 5 to 10 minute mark.

Next, your lead magnet has to be super, super juicy. There's a good chance this is the first time this person is actually coming into contact with you and what you offer, so it needs to reel them in, and it needs to prove to them that you are worth following and worth paying attention to.
So with the lead magnet, it can be really good if you tell them something that they didn't know before, and of course this does rely on knowing who your audience member actually is. If you have people who are super new to their health, then teaching them something basic like to drink clean water and eat breakfast, might be something they haven't heard before. But if your audience are further along in their health journey, then they know to eat breakfast and drink clean water, so you'll need to beef it up and tell them something that they haven't heard before. It does come down to knowing who you're talking to.

The next thing you can do is offer them a quick win, so something that they can implement quickly that will get them a quick result. Imagine if they read your lead magnet, they did something that you told them to do, and then they actually got a result! They felt better, they had less brain fog, they had more energy, they felt better after waking up from a night's sleep. That would make them want to pay attention. That would really prove to them that you were someone to follow. ​

So what kind of lead magnets work best? There are five that tend to work the best in the health and wellness industry.

1) Cheat sheet
A cheat sheet is a very edited down version that kind of gives some quick information that they can refer to. Maybe it would be a quick energy cheat sheet. It would be a list of a few things that help them get more energy in any given day.

2) Checklist
Checklists convert super well because people love something they can check off. A checklist is quick and easy to consume, plus it doesn't take you that long to make. You don't want to be spending days and days and days making a lead magnet. It shouldn't take you that long to make. Maybe it's a bedtime routine checklist because you're niche is sleep so they can actually check off all the things that they should do before bed in order to get a good night's sleep​.

3) Quick guide
This is like the e-book idea, but edited down to be very, very quick. I love calling it a quick guide because it tells people up front that you don't need them to commit much time to actually get the information. So if you do have an e-book out there, edit it down, turn it into a quick guide, and make sure it only takes 5 to 10 minutes to consume.

4) Short video/short video series
Remember people have short attention spans, so you don't want to make it too involved, but a quick 10 to 15 minute video or maybe a quick video series that includes 3-5 minute videos, that can be a really good way to teach your ideal client about what they need to learn about first before they eventually want to take the step and start working with you.

5) Case study
I find this works really well for health and wellness. If you've had great results with clients and those people are willing to share their results with your people, you can create a case study. Maybe you go through one or two case studies where you show them, this person came to me with XYZ problem, this is what we did, and after this amount of time, this is the result they got and this is their testimonial.

Now go create your high quality lead magnet and let those email subscribers roll on in!

Webinars that Convert for Wellness Professionals (CLIENTS ON AUTOPILOT!)

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Have you been considering running a webinar to bring new clients in the door? Well you're in luck because in my new video I'm going to teach you a webinar format that converts AND will help you turn those prospective clients into paying clients.

I ran my health coaching business for five years, and during that time, I hosted many webinars - some failures and some successes. But what I found when it comes to running a webinar, is that there are five key ingredients for success. 

 1) Strategic focus
 2) Bribery
 3) Keep them short and sweet
 4) Urgency
 5) Q&A session

Let's start with step number one: strategic focus. Your webinar topic has to be virtually the same as the ultimate product or service that you are going to pitch or sell at the end of the webinar. That means that if you're selling a weight loss program, your webinar actually has to be specific to weight loss and not some other similar topic like body image or mindful eating. Your program or service should actually feel like the natural transition for viewers who want to go deeper after learning from your webinar. So using the example of weight loss, if you are selling a 12-week weight loss program, then maybe the title of your webinar is "Five Shocking Reasons You Can't Lose Weight & What to do About it". In this example, people who are interested in weight loss are going to be very interested in signing up for your webinar. And once you teach them why they aren't having the weight loss success that they desperately want and then you give them a few actionable tips and strategies. Naturally, those who are interested in getting bigger results are going to gravitate or at least be interested in the product or program that you are selling at the end of your webinar.

Number two is bribery. People are pretty distracted these days which means if you don't give people an incentive to stay the course of your webinar, there is a really good chance that they're going to get distracted by their phone, maybe someone coming over, and they're going to drop off and they're never going to get to your pitch at the end of the webinar. So you need to make it worth their while to stay, and nothing works better than what I call ethical bribery. This might be free access into the program you're selling, or maybe it's a free product that they would be interested in like a Vitamix or maybe it's a free 60-minute consultation with you. Whatever it is, you need to make it juicy - something that they're actually really going to want. And you need to make this really clear at the beginning of the webinar. You need to tell them, "Hey, for those of you who stay with me till the end, you can be entered to win this free thing." And usually how I do this, is I say a secret word at the end of the webinar that they can then email to my team to get entered into the contest. But of course, you don't want to give that secret word away until you have finished your pitch. Without bribery, there really just isn't the incentive to stay to the end of the webinar.

Number three is short and sweet. The biggest mistake I see a lot of people doing is that they overwhelm the viewer by giving away way too much information in their webinar. As much as you feel super passionate about the topic you are teaching, if you make it too long and you overwhelm the viewer, it's a sure thing that they're going to just drop off. The content of your webinars should share a maximum of three to five points and it needs to be completely related to your webinar topic and ultimately your product topic. I also recommend that you give them something actionable during your presentation that they can do right now in order to experience a quick win. If you give your viewer a quick win, they're going to be way more interested in potentially entering your program, or if they're not ready to buy it then, they will probably still follow you and potentially they could become a buyer in the future.

The fourth ingredient is urgency. If you want people to take action at the end of your webinar, you need to put just the little bit of pressure on them. Otherwise, they'll get distracted and totally forget to invest in your program even if they had the intention to do so. Some people call this a fast-acting bonus. Trust me, it works. This is where you give them incentive to actually take that urgent action. So this might be a discount code that expires at midnight, or it might be some juicy bonus that they can only get if they sign up in the next 48 hours. And you should always include this urgency or fast-acting bonus. Even if you have your cart open for 10 to 14 days, you want to give them incentive to actually act right away. Remember, you do want to make it juicy enough that they can't help but take that urgent action.

The last tip is the Q&A or the question and answer session. This is your time to shine and you should always include this at the end of your webinar. This allows viewers to connect with you personally and inquire about working with you further. So regardless of who is asking questions in the questions box or if maybe nobody is asking questions in the questions box, that is okay. I recommend coming prepared with a list of questions to pretend to ask that highlight the benefit of your program. And like I said, even if no one actually ask this, you want to fake it because this is actually doing your viewer a favor by giving them more information about your program. So for example, if you have a weight loss program, one objection might be from someone who says, "Hey, I'm plant-based, I'm a vegan. Does this program actually include recipes that I can eat?" And you're going to be like, "Yes, it does actually, all of the recipes can be modified to be vegan or plant-based." Another example would be, "Annie says she has fatigue along with weight loss. Will this program actually help her get more energy and lose weight at the same time?" And your response is going to be, "Yes, Annie, it absolutely will. The information taught in this program actually helps build overall health and people can see a resolution of lots of different symptoms including energy or brain fog or digestive issues." The question and answer is the time to help address questions that you believe your ideal might have when it comes to making that decision to work with you.

Now that you understand the five juicy ingredients of a high-converting webinar, maybe you're hungry for some more delicious tips to optimize your online business?! So make sure to sign up for my weekly business tips here. These are tips that are specific to your health coaching business and things that I saw success with, with running my own health coaching practice.

If you've got a program and you're wondering how to price it, then make sure to check out my video, Pricing Methods and Strategies for Your Signature Coaching Program!