email marketing

Email Marketing Part 2

WATCH THE EPISODE

LISTEN TO THE EPISODE

Check out part 2 of the 360 Health Biz Podcast email marketing series.

In this episode, Christine & I discussed two important items:
- the legal stuff of email marketing
- email nurture sequences

One is unsexy, one is VERY sexy. Can you guess which is which? If you guessed the email nurture sequence is the sexy one, you are correct!

In the episode we provide 6 email nurture sequence ideas, and NONE of these emails include selling!

Check out the full show notes here. If you haven't listened to part 1, find it here.

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Enrollment for my HTMA Expert Course is now open! Interested in learning how to interpret hair tissue mineral analysis? Enroll in my 6 week course here: https://go.kendraperry.net/htma

TRANSCRIPTS

Christine H.: Hello, and welcome everyone, to this new episode of the 360 Health Biz Podcast. Today, you have your two favorite hostesses with the [most-esses 00:00:11] in the Health Biz Podcast world. Miss Kendra Perry from Canada, being snowed in right now. Then, Christine Hansen from Luxembourg, where it's actually pretty sunny for this, generally. We're really excited to be with you today, as we are recording our second episode on email. How to write your email, how to structure it. We already talked about it in the last episode, so check that out. Today, we're mainly going to talk about how to make it work for you to do sales.

Christine H.: Stay tuned, but before we dive deep into the nitty gritty of this, we have a lovely, lovely listener who we adore who left us a review. Here's what's been said about us.

Kendra Perry: Okay, so we have a review from Jennifer [Blaugh 00:00:58], and I hope I said your last name right, Jennifer. She is an FDM. The title of her review is, "Seriously on-point content." Thank you, Jennifer. She says, "I am a fellow FDM, and I am trying to ramp up my health pushing business. I've been listening to all sorts of podcasts and webinars. This one is legitimately chock-full of great content, relevant information and useful, actionable advice. Seriously great stuff. Thank you, ladies, for all your hard work." Well, you are welcome, Jennifer, and we fucking love you.

Christine H.: Yes. Yes, we do. We love this so much. My little heart is singing right now.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: This is amazing. Thank you. We're going to do our best to spoil you rotten in this episode as well. As email marketing is a huge, huge thing. A tool that is not easy. I think a lot of it can go wrong, but it's also the first thing that a lot of us are confronted with. Today, we're going to basically pick up on our last conversation. To let you know, first of all, how can you stay on the legal side, and then how can you make people just give you their money like a buttery, sweet transaction leaving everyone happy? Kendra, let's begin.

Kendra Perry: All right. We're going to bore you a bit first, so stick with us. Then, we're going to get into the sexier stuff. We do want to address the legal stuff, just because it is really important. You want to make sure you're not breaking the law with email marketing. Then, we're going to talk about email nurture sequence. You may not know what it is. Actually, a lot of the coaches I've talked to don't know what it is. We're going to talk about what that is, and why you need one, and how to do it. We're going to give you a step-by-step process.

Christine H.: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: We're going to be talking a bit of the legal stuff. Christine is going to speak to the GDPR stuff, which is the European rules, because she's more familiar with that. I just wanted to speak to some of the Canadian and American rules. This is one thing that's across the board. You need to get people's permission to email market to them. If you have a bunch of people's emails from something else, and they didn't give you their email address knowing that you were going to send them marketing emails, you actually can't use their email. You're not allowed to do that. That's completely illegal, and it's against privacy. You don't want to do that. You always want to make sure that people know they're opting in, you have people's permission to use that email.

Christine H.: Yeah, so maybe to give you a concrete example, let's say you go to a networking event and you exchange business cards. You are not allowed to take those business cards and type that email address of that person into your email marketing software. First of all, it's not polite. People are going to be annoyed at you, because when it happens to me, I get furious. It's also illegal. Anyone who gives you their email address that doesn't explicitly say, "Okay, you are allowed to send me new, or regular updates," basically that's illegal.

Christine H.: The same is also, and i know that a lot of people do giveaways, or if you are having a fair, you have things where you can win something, and then the entry, not tickets basically, have the email address of the person as well. You do need to have it a disclaimer somewhere that really, clearly states that you are going to email them regularly. Otherwise, again, you're a criminal, basically.

Kendra Perry: You're a criminal. A way that I do this that makes it really obvious. On all my landing pages where I'm offering something for free, the button always says, "Join my list, and you'll get the free guide." It always says that so it's very clear that they're joining my list. Yeah, you just want to be really obvious with that, because I have come across the people who are like, "Oh, I have all these emails from my personal training clients. Can I use that?" I'm like, "No." You could email them and say, I'm going to be sending out emails on this. Are you interested? Do you want to be on this list? If they say yes, then you can use that email but you do need to get their permission first.

Christine H.: Exactly. The same is true, actually, when you do sales calls, or preliminary sessions or whatever you call them. The people who leave their email address there to get a reminder of a call, they did not accept to be on your email list. Unless you tell them that they are going to be added, and have a checkbox to ask them whether they are okay with that or not, you cannot just connect your scheduler to your email software, and then automatically add them. It sounds so easy, and it wounds like, "Okay, I'm going to get a little leads," which I agree, but it's not legal.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. Something you can do, like what I do, is I do add my clients to my email marketing list if I ever have to send communication to my clients specifically, but I exclude them from all the marketing emails. They're literally just getting the occasional email, like, "I just raised my prices. Here is the information. This is changing." Anything that's specific to client communication where I want to email all of them, but they don't get the marketing emails. That's really important.

Kendra Perry: Now, in terms of opting in, there is something called a single opt-in, and a double opt-in. The single opt-in is when you literally just put your email into that landing page, or that pop-up. Then, they automatically get the thing. A double opt-in is where they put their email address in, and then they get another email that says, "Confirm your subscription," or something like that, so they have to double opt-in.

Christine H.: They have to click on that.

Kendra Perry: Now, from what I can tell, and I know it was like this. I can't tell if it changed. I went online and did some research, but in the US you can have a single opt-in. In Canada, you have to have a double opt-in. If you're a Canadian, you're going to go with that double opt-in option, because that's the law. In the US, you can have single opt-in.

Kendra Perry: You can get this set up. All the email providers will have this option. You can turn it off, you can turn it on. It's usually just the clickable button anytime you are building out your sort of little email sequence, or little form. If you are in Canada, and I don't know if you know that in terms of Europe. Do you need a double opt-in?

Christine H.: I am not sure, to be honest. I don't think so, but I would actually check on that in a second.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, so we'll throw that in the show notes.

Christine H.: Yes, exactly, but I don't think so. I don't think you need the double opt-in necessarily, no.

Kendra Perry: Okay.

Christine H.: There's different statistics as well that show that if you have a double opt-in, the people who actually bother to click that link are going to be much more likely to actually engage with your emails.

Kendra Perry: Yes.

Christine H.: Even if it's not a requirement, it might be a good practice to already filter tire kickers who are just going to take space in your email marketing software. Just to make sure that you have primo material in there.

Kendra Perry: Exactly, yeah. I agree. Just that extra step, because a lot of people just get shiny object syndrome. They're just like, "Fuck yeah, I want to opt in," and they just opt in for all these things. Then, they never actually go to their email and check that, right?

Christine H.: Exactly. This is something which, actually we can talk about this right now. If you do this, basically what happens, when people fill in their email address and they click submit, or get now or whatever, you usually have a choice from your email marketing software to either just reload the form, or to send them to a different page. Whatever you choose is fine, but there should be a little message popping up, telling them to check their inbox, check their spam box or their junk folder, to make sure that they get that second email.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: If you don't, people might just be frustrated because they think it's not working, when it's actually in their spam. We always recommend to personalize, and customize that, and already do that in your voice. If you're someone like Kendra and I, we would probably say, "Woop-woop," or something like that. You're good, now go over to your inbox and make sure that we didn't land in your spam folder. A sad face, something like that. Make sure you-

Kendra Perry: Yup. You bring up a good point there, and I think it's also a good point. You know, so many of you guys just have forms on your website? Then, when people opt in, nothing happens. I've seen a few websites where it's like, you get the thing but there's nothing that tells me what's going to happen next, and just so remember, they're giving away something that's personal. You need to make them feel...

Christine H.: Protected.

Kendra Perry: ... protected by saying, "Awesome. You're in. That guide, or that checklist is on its way to your inbox. It's going to be there in five to 10 minutes, so make sure to check your promotions or spam. If you have any issues, this is my support email where," you know.

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: Sometimes, forms are broken, right?

Christine H.: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: If you have someone opt in for something and they don't get the thing, and they have no way of contacting you to be like, "This didn't work," that trust is gone.

Christine H.: Yeah. Agreed.

Kendra Perry: Just saying.

Christine H.: Totally. The second thing that I find will distinguish you from the crowd is that confirmation email that is coming then. A second email that is going to be, "Click here to..." I don't remember what they say, it's a confirmation email. Usually, your email software will allow you to customize that, so brand it. Brand it according to how the newsletters are going to look like afterwards. Write it in your lingo. Tell them, "You are our favorite. Now, just click this little thing and we're good to go." Something that you would say so that people immediately see that you're not a robot, and it's not just tack, but it's actually you behind your business. I find that really makes you stand off on the crowd. You can make it a bit funny.

Kendra Perry: I would say the other thing too, is in the subject line, what I always put is in brackets, "Download," and the name of the thing.

Christine H.: Yes.

Kendra Perry: Make it really obvious so they're like, "I'm downloading this free sleep guide," and it says, "Download, Free sleep guide." I'm not searching for it. It's not some fancy email subject that I don't recognize as what I just downloaded. That's really important. In that confirmation email, this is not a time to sell, this is not a time to offer anything. Literally, keep it short and sweet. Say, "Thanks for downloading the guide, this is awesome. Here is the download button." They're just warming up at that point, so it's not time to pitch a course, or pitch a service, or even your free call in that email.

Christine H.: No, no, no. Don't do that.

Kendra Perry: Before we get into email sequence, could you just briefly speak to, Christine, just the GDPR [inaudible 00:10:59]? I think that's important for, I think everyone. Not just your emails, right?

Christine H.: No, I agree. Yeah, so GDPR has been creating [inaudible 00:11:05] especially in that two years ago when it came out. Basically, what it is, you need to know that it was a huge problem that too many people got spam emails. The European Union basically made it illegal to collect data. Well, illegally as we've discussed it now, but also certain types of data, and you have to have a structure within your company. There needs to be a designated person who is taking care of that. You need to make sure that you're never going to give the information that you gather from your people to a third party. All of that was created, and thrown out there. It's easy if you're a huge company and you have a legal team taking care of it. If you're a small business, it can be completely overwhelming.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: In the beginning you had all worst case scenarios. Truth is that there hasn't been a single legal case done yet, so there is no previous court case yet. Chances that someone is going to pick on your little company to be the first one is very, very unlikely. There's different things that you can do. The double opt-in is one thing that is going to protect you straightaway. The other thing that you need to do is, you need to have a little checkbox below the opt-in form, which means there's a little box that people fill in their email address. We've discussed this before, if you want to add their first name or not. This little box, they need to check the box where they really give you consent through that. There again, the wording can be, "I agree with terms and conditions," or, "I agree with your privacy..."

Kendra Perry: Policy?

Christine H.: Policy, privacy policy. You need to have that on your website. There needs to be a link to that on your website to that privacy policy. Every website needs to have that, and you can have templates that are GDPR compliant. It's just really to cover your ass, basically. To make sure that their email is just for you, and your company and not for anyone else, and so forth.

Christine H.: It used to be a bit tricky, because obviously the emails are being stored on your email marketing service. The questions was, is that a third party seller or not? I think no answer has really been found yet. There's a lot of nitty gritty on that. I'm not a complete legal expert on it. What I can recommend you to do, and I know that the Being Boss team, they have a podcast which I actually recommend, they have done tons of research on that. They spend a lot of money on that, and they have a great podcast episode on that too. Go, and check that out.

Christine H.: For the rest, I invested in a GDPR template that was developed by a lawyer here in Europe. I think she was German, I'm not sure. It's basically the linguistics, it's highlighting when you have to fill in your own things. It will ask you to have an office designated for all of this, but if you're a one-person company obviously you are going to be the officer. It just means that there needs to be a person that is good to be responsible for the information that you are collecting.

Christine H.: I think the little checkbox is the most important one. Personally, I also have to say that I'm a slacker, and I haven't done it. I also have to say that different email software is so much better at this than others. I know that MailerLite has one that is GDPR compliant. You just tick that box when you set up your opt-in box, and you just say you want your advert, and it is filled with GDPR compliant lingo. You basically don't have to worry about it.

Christine H.: The negative thing is that they can be off-putting to people. Every step that you're adding to the process of people giving you their information is going to put them off. It's literally the easiest, the quickest is the best. I also have to add that, of all the European websites that I've seen so far, there's not many that are actually doing this. Literally, none.

Christine H.: I think it was just a huge scare two years ago or so, and right now people are breathing again and it's loosening up again a little bit. What I would suggest you do is to have a double opt-in and to have a little checkbox next to your email box to make sure that people know that they are giving you their information, and where you say that you won't sell it, or that you won't share it with a third party. Then, you're good to go.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. Yeah, and I just want to mention that-

Christine H.: Have a privacy policy.

Kendra Perry: Yes.

Christine H.: Sorry. That's one thing that you need to have.

Kendra Perry: You do, and especially if you're running any ads. Facebook will disapprove your ad if you're sending people to a page that doesn't have a privacy policy, or doesn't have a GDPR link.

Kendra Perry: The other thing I just want to mention is, this is something that applies to more than just Europeans. If anyone is opting in from Europe to your page, that technically makes you need to have [crosstalk 00:16:01].

Christine H.: ... reliable.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. If you don't know where your people are coming from, and I guarantee there might be one person, a few people, or even an American or a Canadian who are just in Europe traveling.

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: I think the double opt-in is a good way to go.

Christine H.: It's a good way to go. It's not compliant... That's not what I want to say. It's not mandatory. It's not something you need to do, but I just think you are covering your bases a bit if you have it, and make it fun. It's a pain-in-the-ass, but make it fun.

Kendra Perry: Definitely.

Christine H.: That would be a good one. All right.

Kendra Perry: All right, let's stop with the boring shit.

Christine H.: We already gave some good shit there, on how you can it less boring, so that's fun.

Kendra Perry: Okay, we're going to be talking about email nurture sequence, which is basically... it is a sequence of emails that you send new subscribers. The whole purpose of it is to build trust, to have them get to know you and your sort of method, and also how you can help them, right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: I can't remember the touch points, but usually before people invest, I read it was 36.

Christine H.: 36?

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: Crazy.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, that's what Chalene Johnson said on her Build Your Tribe. She said it used to be much smaller, but these days it's about 35 or 36.

Christine H.: Oh, wow.

Kendra Perry: I might be a bit off on that number. What that means is that they need to see 36 different pieces, or come into contact with your brand 36 different times before they're ready to buy. That might be that they listen to a podcast episode, and then they receive an email. Then, they see a social media post, and then they get another email. That's the thing. That's why it's really important not to pitch too quickly, because it can people a really long time to warm up. I had two touch points with certain people and me, personally, I invested really quickly in certain people's things because I just connected instantly, so it's not going to be true for everyone. For some people it's going to be longer, right?

Christine H.: Yes.

Kendra Perry: That email sequence really just helps them get to know you, and decide if they like you and just get familiar with who you are, what you do and how you can really help them. I've seen email sequences be three emails, I've seen it be up to 30-40 emails. Again, it's going to be different for everyone.

Kendra Perry: Again, it depends on your business. You may have to test different lengths. For new people who haven't done this before, I usually recommend a six-email sequence. I think that's enough time to sort of tell your story, introduce your method and gain a bit of trust with your audience. We've already talked about email number one, which the only purpose of email number one is to deliver your free offer, and also, I say, set the stage.

Kendra Perry: I always tell people, if you're sending them another email, I just say, "I'm going to be sending you a few emails over the next couple weeks that's going to teach you about this, this and this." Tomorrow, or two days from now, or in an hour from now, or however you set it up, "I'm going to be sending you an email titled," insert subject line, "Stay tuned for that email."

Christine H.: Yes, great. [crosstalk 00:19:09] The other thing I really quickly want to mention is that we call it either email nurture sequence, or an email funnel. I just want to say that these two things are the same. It's just different lingo in marketing. Then, also it really depends, as Kendra said, on what your business is. If you want to sell products, if you want to sell coaching services, which I guess most of you do. It also depends on the price point. What do you want to sell at the end of your funnel?

Christine H.: The first thing you should do, and I think we were already talking about that when we discussed the freebie, which is people actually want, and give you their email address that triggers all of this. It has to be created with what you want to sell at the end of the sequence, right?

Kendra Perry: Yes.

Christine H.: We talk a lot about this, but you need to have the goal in mind first. Then, reverse-engineer it. What is your end goal so that you can seed, slowly and subtly, without shoving it down their throat. Have that in your mind first, and then email number one in this sequence, or funnel would be where you just deliver the freebie. That is basically the end. If you reverse-engineer it, it's actually the last step, so to say. That's just a little clarification for newbies who have no clue what we're talking.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and that's really important. It's like, if you ultimately want to sell them a program that helps them boost their energy, then your email nurture sequence shouldn't be about gut health, right?

Christine H.: Yes.

Kendra Perry: You keep coming back to one thing. This is the most important thing, and we know that most coaches are struggling with this. You need to have a clearly-defined niche. Not two, not three, not four, not 10. One niche that people actually know what it is. I see people niche-ing in metabolism. Nobody knows what metabolism is.

Christine H.: Nobody knows what it is.

Kendra Perry: Right?

Christine H.: Yes. Don't forget that your lingo needs to be what they speak, not what you learned in your education.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, absolutely. I know health coaches are super nerdy, and you want to prove that you're smart, and that you're knowledged. If you speak in words that they don't understand, there'll be no connection. You just want to make sure that everything is connected, which is a really good point.

Christine H.: You can have several of those sequences, or funnels in your business. If you have, for example, products, if you have a supplement line, or if you have DIY programs, or Evergreen programs, you might have different opt-ins on your website that will lead to those different product [inaudible 00:21:35]. You would have different funnels in your email marketing software.

Christine H.: What we're going to teach you today, you can basically take those emails and just personalize them to that product, or service that you are designing. The content, their personality, or the feeling that [inaudible 00:21:53] about is going to be the same.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and guys, I have a template. I have an email nurture sequence template, and we will link to that in the show notes so that you guys can get access to that. I think that'll be really helpful.

Kendra Perry: In your nurture sequence, let's say we've delivered the freebie. You're going to send them another email, and you might send it an hour later, you might send it a day later, you might send it two days later. It depends, and you may have to play with that. You can set this up with any email marketing platform. This is going to be called an automation, I believe, in most email platforms.

Christine H.: In automation, or workflow I've seen it as well.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, right. I think I've seen it as workflow too, yeah. The first email that you sent after that confirmation email, this was email number two... You want to tell them your compelling story about either why you struggled with your own health that's related to your niche, or maybe why you're so passionate about it. I guess not all of us have personal stories with our niche, but if you do have a personal story, tell it. If you don't, there's obviously a reason why you decided to niche in this, and you obviously feel passionate about it for a reason. Tell that story, and you want to make it compelling, okay?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: People want to know your story, but you also want to refer back to them as much as possible.

Christine H.: Yes, certainly.

Kendra Perry: I like to do, can you relate? Does that make sense? Have you had that experience? Is this familiar? Always coming back to them. You really want to spend some time on this. You want to make sure your story is compelling. Then, what I do with this is, I basically end the email in the middle of the story climax, or that most dramatic part of the story. That's going to be... I think I've heard it called a few different things, and I'm gapping on it, but literally it's that darkest point, or that vague transition point in the story where everything changed. Usually, we can tell a story somehow in that way, where you maybe were interested in health and then suddenly you realize, you're like, "Oh, my God," or in your own personal story you were like, "I was struggling so hard, I hit rock bottom. Then, I discovered this thing."

Kendra Perry: End that story in the middle of the climax so they're like, "Oh, my God, I need to know what happens next." Then, you're going to say, in one day, in two days, in three days, whatever, "I'm going to send you the next email titled..." Give them the title, "where I'm going to share this, this and this." The rest of your story. Yeah.

Christine H.: Exactly. That's something that happens too much, and it depends, I guess, whether your clients are confronted with this a lot or not, I personally can see through this now. I don't like it if I get too many emails at once. Yeah, sometimes I recommend to start with one a day, and then space it out every two days. I like that, actually, but just tell them in a couple of days you're going to get the next [inaudible 00:24:42] or something like that.

Kendra Perry: I think I send my note every two days. That seems to work for me.

Christine H.: I think that's polite. Yeah, exactly. The other thing that you can do is, while you are talking about your story you can already sprinkle in a testimonial. What you can say is, which later on have my client X, Y, Z with their da-da-da. It's just going to be read fluidly. People don't really realize that they've read this testimonial already, but they are ready to connect with you with success stories about their problems. That's a good way of doing it. Then, I think what we do a lot in our emails is, can you relate, or if you have a question reply to me now. Just say, "Reply to this email," and actually those people do that.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and I do that in pretty much every email I send out. I say, "Reply to this email and let me know." It's great, because if they actually do reply to that email, your emails are probably never going to end up in their spam, or promotions ever again, which is great in terms of deliverability. You can also get a lot of research. You can learn a lot about them. I store all these email replies in my Gmail, and then when I'm going to writing a sales page, or creating some sort of training I literally go through, and I look at the words they're using, and how they're describing their problem. You can actually learn a lot about them. Then, people are pretty excited when they reply, and then you actually reply back and help them.

Christine H.: Yes. Exactly.

Kendra Perry: They're like, "Oh, my God, I can't believe you responded." That's a really good way to do that. Now, I often add that in a PS. I'll be like, "PS: Reply to this email with," blah-blah-blah, or at the end of the email. Then, in your email number three, that's where you're telling the part two of your story, where you're basically telling them exactly how you solved your problem, or you solved someone else's problem. You basically teach them how you're going to show them to do the same with their problem.

Kendra Perry: You just sort of pick up on that story, and then what you want to do is, again, tell them, "I'm going to send you another email in two days," or whatever and, "This is the title of the next email."

Christine H.: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: Those would be a couple of things. Run through your sequence, and I'm going to go and do other things as well, so we're going to see.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. All right, so email number four, I call this Aggravate the Problem and Surprise Them. Remember, they have a problem, I'm just going to use fatigue as an example. When I say aggravate the problem, you really want to make them feel like, this is a problem. I'm tired all the time. I wake up and I'm tired. I walk through the day like a fucking zombie because I'm exhausted. I come home and I'm even more tired. This is causing me pain. I'm missing out on all these other things I want to do in my life because I'm so fucking tired. You really want to speak to those pain points. Pain points are basically the problems that your ideal client has. If we use fatigue as an example, it might be, "I wake up in the morning and I feel like shit, even though I slept for eight hours." That's a pain point, right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: "I crash in the middle of the day at 2:00 PM, and I need to have a nap." That's a pain point, right?

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: Try to think of all those issues that they have in relation to the one bigger problem that they have.

Christine H.: Great. Okay, surprise them.

Kendra Perry: With Surprise Them, it's kind of like empower them that they have the power to change their situation. That's how you surprise them, because they may have been told by doctors that, "You're just a middle aged woman, and you're just getting older," right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: They've probably been disempowered with their health. They may not actually really know, or feel that they can change their problems. Surprise them by telling them that, "Hey, your health is your responsibility, and you can change this. I changed this, and I've changed this in all these other people I've worked with," if you have. You're surprising them to be like, "You know what? This is in your control, and you can change things." That's how you surprise them.

Kendra Perry: I also like to throw in there to tell them it's not their fault. You know? You don't want them feel bad.

Christine H.: Yeah. Oh, my God. Yeah, huge one.

Kendra Perry: Most people have been given terrible information about their health, or they've been told...

Christine H.: This is it.

Kendra Perry: ...You're just a woman, this is normal, you're just getting older. Oh, it's because you're in your late 30s."

Christine H.: Exactly. Here's your diagnosis, now live with it, you know?

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: Exactly. Just saying, if you don't have that story... For example, I don't have personal stories, I use my clients' stories. I would, for example, describe what they tell me when we are on our first call together. Especially with them, I really use similar language. Then, for the surprise factor I would say something, "What he didn't know," or, "What she didn't know was that..." Something that I know when I tell it to my clients their eyes light up, and they're like, "What?" This is actually one of these little things that will already make people feel like, "I knew that there was a link there, but nobody believed me," something like that. That's the surprise element. I just use someone else's story and it works really well. You can write a beautiful narrative.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and I love that you're saying narrative. People really connect to stories. Stories are very much in our DNA. Our ancestors shared stories to spread information. If you can make it like a story, then people are going to be really engaged, and really into it. Then, always at the end of this email you tell them the title of your next email coming, and when you're going to send it.

Kendra Perry: Then, in email five, this is where I like to devote a entire email to a testimonial. Where you share, and if that person has given you permission to use their image, put an image in there. Just tell the story. The whole email is of [Gemma 00:30:36], who was able to reverse her fatigue even though she'd been diagnosed with chronic fatigue, and had it for 10 years, right?

Christine H.: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: How were they able to solve it? Using your particular method, right?

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: Perfect.

Kendra Perry: Again, if you don't have one yet, you could use yourself if you have that personal information, or you could use a friend, a family member, a mentor. Someone who... just anyone.

Christine H.: Yeah, yeah, yeah. At this point, you can actually include your first more pointed call to actions. What that means is, ask them to do something. Before my email sequences were, at the moment I don't have one because I'm too lazy. I am going to do one for this year, and I'm going to record it so stay tuned, I'm going to accomplish that. In the beginning you don't ask them, you just give. You literally just give them. You give them your best story, and something you can maybe do is, "Oh, by the way, here is one of my most popular blog posts. Maybe this can help you to get started straightaway." Something that you already have, they can just click through.

Christine H.: You spoil them, basically. You give them stuff, "Here's a free training that I did. Maybe this can be helpful," and it talks about what I've just talked about in the email. Then, by the time you have the email with a client testimonial, that's when you can actually start asking for something from them. Which could be, "Why don't you book a call and see? If you have questions, just reply here, or just book a call with me." I think this is a good time when you can slowly start to ask for something. Still, don't tell them about a paying program yet.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, I agree. Amy Porterfield calls this micro-conversions, which I really like. You can do this sort of through your email sequence, and my micro-conversions are always in the PSs. I'll be like, "PS: I have an Instagram account where I share business training for health coaches. Make sure to follow me if you're interested." Then, the next might be guests, have a YouTube channel, blah-blah-blah.

Kendra Perry: It's these micro-conversions where they're just small. They're not really asking much of anyone. There's just letting people know that they can click here, get more information. It gets them used to clicking. I always throw those in the PS. I throw them in pretty much any email that I sent out. There's always a PS that tells them to check to something like, "Do you know of a podcast? Check on my podcast. Subscribe if you're interested." Sometimes, people want to binge your stuff. They want more. They're loving it, and they want to see more of your content. If you don't tell them it's there, then they're not going to go and find it on their own.

Christine H.: Exactly. You want to draw them into that rabbit hole of content of yours, into your universe, basically. You want them to gush about you. You want them to know you before you pitch them something. Oh, yeah.

Kendra Perry: Totally agree. Then, the sixth email, this is where I do the full pitch email. I don't just start by saying, "Hey, here's my thing, sign up." I actually explain the method, and how it has really helped me or the client. Again, you're seeding in more testimonial. You're like, "This is my method." I do recommend that, for whatever you do, create some sort of method, or some sort of step-by-step...

Christine H.: Always.

Kendra Perry: ... because there's certain people who make decisions based on knowing that there is a step-by-step process.

Christine H.: Yes, that there's logic behind the madness. [crosstalk 00:34:03] the process.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, they want to know that you can get them from A to B to C, and they want to know that there's a process. Not everyone makes decisions like that, but some people do, right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: There's a really interesting assessment called Colby Assessment. I actually use this with my sales page, because it tells you how people make decisions. Some people are quick start, so they make really quick, impulsive decisions. They're just super fast. There is the fact finders, which need all the information. They need to do all the research. Then, there's the... I can't remember the name of it, the one that wants the A, to B, to C. I can't remember the name of it, but you can look it up. They're the ones that want the step-by-step. That's why I think, regardless of what you're doing, turn it into a method, or a step-by-step process.

Christine H.: Always, and it has to be yours. Your signature method. For me, it's the Sleep Like A Boss method. It's signature, it's proprietary. Get a patent [inaudible 00:34:58], actually, and trademark. That's what's going to make you money, and maybe give you the possibility to even license it out later. Just be savvy about this, even if you're at the very beginning. If you think you're onto something and you've created something amazing that works, just keep it in mind.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, or even if your method is, you're like, we talk about diet, then we talk about life sell. Then, we talk about whatever. That's still a step-by-step process, right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: It doesn't need to be complicated.

Christine H.: No, no.

Kendra Perry: Just call it something, because that's what will draw people in. Then, it's easier because you're like, "This is my method. This is how it's helped. This is the process of my method, and this is the solution that I can help you achieve." You really want to focus on in the pitch email. Don't list out the features of your program, and what they're get. Features just meaning, you get a 60-minute consult, and then you get access to this app. Then, you get a Facebook group. Then, you get testing, or whatever. Those are features, and that's not what sells something. People buy because of the outcome you can help them achieve. You really want to go through, what are they going to feel like if they decide to invest in you? What's that going to look like? How is their life going to be better? How is their life going to be worse if they don't take this step, right?

Christine H.: Exactly. Exactly. Then, you literally just tell them, "Click here if this is for you," or something like that.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and for a lot of you guys, I know a lot of you guys are doing one-on-one programs. You're just going to send them the link to your free sales call, or enrollment call, qualifying call, whatever you want to call it, where basically... We should do an episode on sales because I think a lot of people really fuck up sales calls. The sales call-

Christine H.: We will, we will.

Kendra Perry: It's not a health history. It's not a coaching call. It's literally you inviting them to see if they're ready to transform. You see if they're ready to change.

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: You just want to qualify them, and see if they actually are a good fit for your program, and if they're someone you can help.

Christine H.: There's something you can do as well, especially with health coaching. Our clients are not necessarily who are like us, or like Kendra and I at least, who do a lot of marketing geeking. You can actually tell them that you only work with a certain number of people, or are opening a certain number of spots. With me, that's actually true. I only work with five people at a time. Even if it's not true, it will help those who are on the fence finally prioritize.

Christine H.: It's not just like I'm pokering, or I'm lying. Essentially, [inaudible 00:37:22] game time, and this is time to change your health. When you just tell them, "I'm opening up my schedule for a certain number of people, so make sure you don't miss it," I think it still works. When I'm interested in something and I stop someone and I see it, it still triggers that FOMO in me, you know?

Kendra Perry: Yeah, yeah. I think people need urgency, right?

Christine H.: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: They need a bit of pressure to take action. Don't be upset if, at this point the person still doesn't book the call. Remember, we said 36 touch points, right?

Christine H.: [crosstalk 00:37:59] sometimes, yeah.

Kendra Perry: Exactly. It will depend on how many touch points they've had with you before they opted in for your freebie and went through the email sequence. Maybe they were only four in, so they might not be ready yet but that's why we're sending out weekly emails. That's where you want to email your list weekly, and provide them with value. For each one of those emails that you send out, that's another touch point. It's getting them closer to the point where, if they are interested in investing, that they're going to want to invest.

Christine H.: Agreed.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. If you want to get into more complex stuff, if people don't book the sales call you can follow up with more emails, reminding them or whatever. Obviously, that gets a bit more complicated, and I know a lot of you guys probably just have really basic email marketing skills. Just so you know what the possibility is, right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: You can track people who book a sales call, and then follow up. Sometimes, people are interested, but then their baby starts crying and they go to the baby, and they've forgotten about it. It happens all the time, right?

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: What do we have? Four-second attention span? Less than that of a goldfish? There you go.

Christine H.: Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Absolutely, agreed.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: I think that's it. Is there anything that we have?

Kendra Perry: Yeah, so that's our email nurture sequence. We will make sure to link to the template, if you guys want to grab that in the show notes, which basically just explains out all these sort of steps in detail that you might find helpful. Then, you can be on our email list.

Christine H.: Exactly. There's different things. I know that we say a lot of the times that I'm actually just [inaudible 00:39:29] playing around with it at the moment. I'm seeing staggering numbers, but just like before we said you shouldn't use any pictures or so forth in your email. Actually, I'm using a new software that's called FlowDesk, and it's really pretty. It's in beta, so it's not sophisticated, it doesn't have bells and whistles yet, but it's beautiful. I have to say, my conversion is up in the 50%s, which is a lot, but you make conversion. It's doing really, really well. I know it's glitchy with other people sometimes, but it's actually shifted my perception on whether you should use photos or not. I can see that my crowd really likes, and responds to pretty, which makes sense because my whole branding is built on doing that [crosstalk 00:40:16].

Kendra Perry: I always recommend to keep images out of that first confirmation email. Right?

Christine H.: Oh, yeah. Don't do it on the first one.

Kendra Perry: That's when they're not engaged. Later on, once people have gone through my email sequence, and then I'm sending them weekly emails I might actually have images in those, because at that point they're engaged. They've opened up a few of my emails and told their email service provider that actually this is not spam.

Christine H.: Exactly. It looks just beautiful. We get so many ugly emails, and just having something pretty in your life, it's just going to help them to at least have a longer glance. Then, what I like about this one is actually that you have a little Instagram feed of your last three posts at the bottom. Which I really like, because it gives you an insight into what you do. It's just more personal, and I feel that as coaches we sell based on emotion. We sell based on, yes, people want the logic, but the first thing they're going to see is whether they can connect with you.

Christine H.: It's a bit of a different game than when you're selling an Etsy store or something like that. It's a different ball game. You have to keep that emotion in mind, which is also why the sequence we've just presented is based so much on story. Much more than if you sell underwear, or I don't know, something else, a product. This is just why it differentiates a bit from what you've seen in other podcasts, or marketing courses or so forth. It's just what we see works well with the people we want to help.

Kendra Perry: That's great. Is it an app that you use to add your Instagram feed into the bottom of the email?

Christine H.: It's just part of their software. It's just a drag and drop thing, and you just drop the Instagram feed and it connects to Instagram. It's a pain sometimes to use, switch it off, switch it on again. Then, every email that goes out, which is every week for me, has the last three posts of my Instagram feed.

Kendra Perry: That's awesome.

Christine H.: Yeah, it's pretty cool.

Kendra Perry: If you guys don't have FlowDesk, I'm sure there's a third party app out there that will do that, you know?

Christine H.: Yes. I'm sure there is.

Kendra Perry: I guarantee it. Yeah, I put all kinds of weird things into the bottom of my email. Especially during launches. Put little timers in there, and all that stuff.

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: I'm sure something exists. That's all we got for you guys, and I really hope that was helpful. If you are listening to this episode on your phone, make sure to screen shot this episode, share it to your Instagram stories and tag 360 Health Biz Podcast, and let us know your take homes. We would love that.

Christine H.: Love, love, love.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: Anything new, leave us a five-star review, let us know. Yeah, thanks for listening, I guess.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. Again, we're always shocked when anyone wants to listen to us.

Christine H.: I know. You just think it's a conversation between the two of us.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: [inaudible 00:42:58] It's weird.

Kendra Perry: We're out there.

Christine H.: All right, you guys. Have a wonderful day. Make sure you listen to these other episodes that we have, and talk to you very soon.